Games from Recent Events

In our salad-green days, the arrival of Chess Review in the mail was a big event. It meant hours of reading enjoyment. The Game of the Month would be annotated by a grandmaster – Max Euwe and Svetozar Gligorich were two. And Games from Recent Events by Hans Kmoch featured great games from the last month with a literate introduction to each.

Consider this from CR, February 1960. It is at the first of a Keres-Petrosyan Sicilian Defence:

The Maroczy Bind is reminiscent of the Maginot Line in that the enemy is held at bay but only in one direction and that at the expense of mobility. If no means are found to support the formation so as to make effective a crossing into the enemy territory, the bind becomes a liability rather than an asset. That factor becomes apparent in this game with a fine and instructive performance by Black.

The game from the Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates of 1959 and can be found at:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1072759

where it is titled “Crouching Tigran, Hidden Dragon”, which is not bad either.

Now we can get the latest games within a day of their play. Here I give six games played within the last week, which have some interest. They are two of Vachier-Lagrave, two of Kramnik and one each of two favorite players, Jobava and Kamsky. Ah, if only there were another Hans Kmoch around to write the introductions!

In the first game MVL loses to a player with an Elo 300 points below his. In the second he draws with Palac, who already has the superior position after 20 moves. The two games cost him 11 rating points and dropped him six places in World Rankings.

Italian Teams 2015
Civitanova Marche, Italy
Round 5, May 1, 2015
Altini, Nicola – Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime
D85 Grunfeld, Exchange Variation

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Bd2 Nb6 6.Bg5 Bg7 7.Nf3 O-O 8.e3 Bf5 9.Be2 N8d7 10.Bh4 h6 11.O-O Nf6 12.Rc1 c6 13.Ne5 Re8 14.g4 Bc8 15.Bf3 Be6 16.Bg3 Nbd7 17.Na4 Rc8 18.b3 Qa5 19.Qe2 Nxe5 20.Bxe5 Nd7 21.Bg3 f6 22.Rfd1 Bf7 23.Nc5 Nxc5 24.Rxc5 Qb6 25.Qc2 e6 26.d5 exd5 27.Bxd5 Bxd5 28.Rdxd5 Rcd8 29.Qxg6 cxd5 30.Rc7 Qxc7 31.Bxc7 Rc8 32.Bf4 Re7 33.Bxh6 Rd8 34.h3 Rd6 35.Bf4 Rdd7 36.Bh6 Rd6 37.Bf4 Rdd7 38.Kg2 a6 39.Bh6 Rd6 40.Bf4 Rdd7 41.Kf3 d4 42.exd4 Rxd4 43.Be3 Rd5 44.h4 f5 45.g5 Rde5 46.Qb6 f4 47.Bxf4 Rf7 48.Kg3 Ref5 49.Be3 Be5+ 50.Kg4 1-0

Italian Teams 2015
Civitanova Marche, Italy
Round 6, May 2, 2015
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime – Palac, Mladen
B90 Sicilian, Najdorf, Adams Attack

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.h3 e5 7.Nde2 h5 8.g3 b5 9.Nd5 Nbd7 10.Bg5 Be7 11.Nxe7 Qxe7 12.Nc3 Bb7 13.Nd5 Bxd5 14.exd5 O-O 15.Bg2 Rfe8 16.O-O e4 17.c3 Qe5 18.Bf4 Qf5 19.Bxd6 Nxd5 20.Re1 1/2-1/2

In the Russian Teams Shirov beats Kramnik in a Berlin. A bishops and knights endgame.

Kramnik and Aronian are on the same team. Just how did that happen?

From chess24.com: The Russian Team Championship was always going to be a fiercely strong event, but the bombshell announcement the day before it began that “Siberia” had added Vladimir Kramnik and Levon Aronian to their line-up added some stardust to the event. How did they end up there? Well, it’s all about money, of course, with the Novosibirsk-based concrete and coal-mining company RATM Holding bankrolling the new team.

Russian Men’s Team Championships
Sochi
Round 1, May 1, 2015
Shirov, Alexei – Kramnik, Vladimir
C67 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence, Open Variation

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.O-O Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Be7 7.Bf1 Nf5 8.Nf3 d5 9.d4 O-O 10.c3 Re8 11.Bd3 Bd6 12.Rxe8+ Qxe8 13.Qc2 g6 14.Nbd2 b6 15.Nf1 Bd7 16.Bg5 Qf8 17.Re1 f6 18.Bd2 Re8 19.Ne3 Nce7 20.c4 dxc4 21.Nxc4 Nd5 22.Be4 Qf7 23.Nxd6 Nxd6 24.Bxd5 Qxd5 25.Qxc7 Nb5 26.Rxe8+ Bxe8 27.Qe7 Qf7 28.Qd8 Nc7 29.Bh6 Nd5 30.Qd6 Ne7 31.g4 Nc8 32.Qd8 Qe6 33.h3 Nd6 34.d5 Nf7 35.dxe6 Nxd8 36.Nd4 a6 37.f4 Nc6 38.Ne2 Ne7 39.Ng3 Bc6 40.f5 gxf5 41.gxf5 Bb5 42.Ne4 Nxf5 43.Nxf6+ Kh8 44.Bf8 a5 45.Kf2 Bc6 46.e7 Nd6 47.Kg3 Ne8 48.Ng4 h5 49.Ne5 Bd5 50.a3 Kg8 51.Kf4 Bb3 52.Kg5 Bd1 53.Nc4 Kf7 54.Nxb6 Nd6 55.Nd5 Ne4+ 56.Kh4 a4 57.Nc3 Nxc3 58.bxc3 Be2 59.Kg5 Ke8 60.h4 Kd7 61.Kf6 Bc4 62.Bh6 Ke8 63.Bf4 Bf7 64.Bg5 Bb3 65.Ke5 Kd7 66.Kd4 Bf7 67.Kc5 Kc7 68.c4 Be8 69.Kd5 Kd7 70.c5 Bg6 71.c6+ Kc7 72.Bf4+ Kc8 73.Ke6 Bf7+ 74.Kf6 Be8 75.c7 Kd7 76.Kg7 1-0

In the second round Kramnik beat Svidler. From the photo on the chess24 site, it looks like Svidler’s broken arm has healed.

Russian Men’s Team Championships
Sochi
Round 2, May 2, 2015
Kramnik, Vladimir – Svidler, Peter
A07 Reti, KIA

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 g6 4.b3 Bg7 5.Bb2 c5 6.c4 d4 7.b4 Nfd7 8.O-O Nc6 9.bxc5 O-O 10.d3 Nxc5 11.Nbd2 Rb8 12.Ba3 Qa5 13.Qc1 Na4 14.Nb3 Qc7 15.Qc2 Bd7 16.Rae1 Rfd8 17.e3 dxe3 18.fxe3 h6 19.d4 Bf5 20.e4 Bg4 21.e5 Nb6 22.Nh4 Nxd4 23.Qf2 Qxc4 24.Re4 Be6 25.Nxd4 Bd5 26.Ne6 Bxe6 27.Rxc4 Nxc4 28.Bxe7 Rd2 29.Qxa7 Bxe5 30.Nf3 Bc7 1-0

Russian Men’s Team Championships
Sochi
Round 1, May 1, 2015
Jobava, Baadur – Zvaginsev, Vadim
A21 English, Kramnik-Shirov Counter-Attack

1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4 3.e4 Nf6 4.Bd3 O-O 5.Nge2 Bc5 6.O-O a6 7.Bc2 Nc6 8.h3 b5 9.d3 bxc4 10.dxc4 h6 11.Rb1 Rb8 12.a3 a5 13.Bd2 d6 14.Nd5 Bd7 15.Bc3 Ra8 16.Kh1 Nh7 17.b4 axb4 18.axb4 Ba7 19.Qd3 f5 20.c5 dxc5 21.bxc5 fxe4 22.Qe3 Ng5 23.Rfd1 Bxh3 24.Ba4 Bd7 25.Nb6 Bxb6 26.Bxc6 Bxc5 27.Qxc5 Ne6 28.Bd5 Qh4+ 29.Kg1 Kh8 30.Bxe6 Bxe6 31.Bxe5 1-0

Russian Men’s Team Championships
Sochi
Round 1, May 1, 2015
Sjugirov, Sanan – Kamsky, Gata
D70 Neo-Grunfeld Defence

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.f3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nb6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.Be3 Nc6 8.Bb5 O-O 9.Nge2 a6 10.Bxc6 bxc6 11.Qc2 Nc4 12.Bf2 e5 13.Na4 Be6 14.Nc5 Qb8 15.Rc1 exd4 16.Nxd4 Qb4+ 17.Ke2 Bd5 18.b3 Na3 19.Qc3 Qxc3 20.Rxc3 Rfe8 21.g4 Nb5 22.Rd3 Bf8 23.Rc1 Nxd4+ 24.Rxd4 f5 25.Kd3 fxe4+ 26.fxe4 Be6 27.Nxe6 Rxe6 28.Bg3 c5 29.Rd5 Rae8 30.e5 Rc6 31.Rd7 Be7 32.Ke4 a5 33.Rc4 Kf7 34.Bh4 Ke6 35.Rxe7+ Rxe7 36.Bxe7 Kxe7 37.Kd5 Ra6 38.Rxc5 Ra7 39.Rc6 Rb7 40.Kc5 Kd7 41.h3 Rb4 42.e6+ Kc8 43.Ra6 Kd8 44.Rxa5 Re4 45.Ra8+ Ke7 46.Rc8 1-0