Ross Siemms pleased with new interest in the game

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  • Hans Jung
    replied
    Probably his best tournament was the 1955 Canadian Championship, second behind Frank Anderson by only half a point, ahead of Joyner, Bohatirchuk, Vaitonis, Geza Fuster, and Maurice Fox amongst others.

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  • Erik Malmsten
    replied
    Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
    Always nice to hear about Ross Siemms. He's a Canadian chess legend from the era of Abe Yanofsky, Maurice Fox, Frank Anderson, et al.
    I only knew him as a legendary junior player, newspaper photos of him as a kid. A decade or so ago, I was very surprised to see him play in an active tournament in Barrie (which he easily won)..

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  • Hans Jung
    replied
    Always nice to hear about Ross Siemms. He's a Canadian chess legend from the era of Abe Yanofsky, Maurice Fox, Frank Anderson, et al.

    Leave a comment:


  • Egidijus Zeromskis
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne Komer View Post
    A Canadian chess master, Siemms still plays regularly, meeting opponents from every corner of the globe — but by computer.
    He keeps a respectful blitz rating at 2150 on chess.com as a 85-year old gent.

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  • Wayne Komer
    started a topic Ross Siemms pleased with new interest in the game

    Ross Siemms pleased with new interest in the game

    Ross Siemms pleased with new interest in the game

    January 11, 2021

    There is an article in the Toronto Sun about Ross Siemms being pleased with the new interest in chess because of the popularity of the series The Queen’s Gambit.

    See:

    https://torontosun.com/news/local-ne...st-in-the-game

    by Liz Braun

    Excerpts:

    The huge popularity of The Queen’s Gambit on Netflix has ignited new interest in the game of chess.

    Few appreciate this more than Ross Siemms, an octogenarian Canadian chess champion who has been playing his whole life.

    As with the series, his story is just as much about time and place as it is about chess. Siemms’ world travels involved sailing on the Queen Mary and flying on a four-engine Lockheed Super Constellation; he played the Russians in the thick of the Cold War and encountered them at the Munich Olympiad in 1958.

    His son, financial consultant Craig Siemms, says

    “If my father’s achievements had been in the game of hockey instead of the game of chess, every Canadian would know his name.”

    Ross Siemms was just seven years old when his father had a heart attack and needed bed rest. Friends dropped in for games of chess and Siemms watched the adults play; before too long, he was moving the chess pieces for his father.

    He was introduced to a chess club where he grew up, in Toronto’s Junction area — the family house on Pacific Ave., where he was born, is still standing.

    Siemms was introduced to the Chess Federation of Canada, and played in the U.S. Junior Championships in 1947. At the age of 11, he travelled to Cleveland with his parents, recalling that he was still young enough to play with a toy firetruck between chess moves.

    “It was at that tournament that I got my first real trophy. I think I finished 11th out of 45 players, and they gave me an award for Best Under 15 in the U.S.

    He won the U.S. junior championship in 1954, in California. He was in Copenhagen in 1953 for the World Junior Championship, and in 1958, he went to Munich to compete in the Chess Olympiad.

    A Canadian chess master, Siemms still plays regularly, meeting opponents from every corner of the globe — but by computer.

    See also: https://forum.chesstalk.com/forum/ch...pion#post30435
    Last edited by Wayne Komer; Monday, 11th January, 2021, 01:52 AM.
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