Globe & Mail Cecil Rosner column Dec 17 2021

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
    Have a Merry Christmas Kerry it certainly is possible. I have a new grandson so it will happen for me.
    Thank you Hans. Perhaps we will meet in the New Year?! lol
    We have had 3 new grandchildren in the last 12.5 months (3 different sibling families...) including our first grand daughter (now 5 months!) ... so we know what you mean!!
    Merry Christmas and Happy & Healthy New Year...
    ...Mike Pence: the Lord of the fly.

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    • #17
      Thanks Kerry. Grandchildren are such a delight. Best wishes for the New Year.

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      • #18
        I just learned chess does not appear in the print version, only online.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
          Have a Merry Christmas Kerry it certainly is possible. I have a new grandson so it will happen for me.
          Congrats Hans! Never to soon to start teaching him chess:)

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          • #20
            GM Bareev describes in his book 'Say NO To Chess Principles' the background of his decision to leave full-time competitive chess. The book is great!

            My take on it is that GM Bluvshtein (born 1988 in the Soviet Union) had more opportunities for a career away from chess, when he was making that decision, in his early 20s. He had Canadian citizenship, a good quality undergraduate degree from York University, his GM title, a rating of 2600+, and a home in Toronto, Canada's most dynamic economic city. Mark's father Ilya is an engineer who was able to establish his career in Canada. So, Mark had options, which he had worked to develop, in a very smart and mature manner. GM Bareev (born 1966) was rising into the world's chess elite in his early 20s, at a time when the Soviet Union was trying to transition to a market economy and a stronger democracy, led by Mikhail Gorbachev, who ascended to Soviet General Secretary in 1985, taking over for previous leaders who were a generation older. Gorby, a favorite in the West, made a lot of progress, but was toppled by a coup in 1991. The Soviet Union then broke up, Boris Yeltsin became President of Russia, and it was a very turbulent time. Look at where we are now, with Russia led by Vladimir Putin, who is making Hitler-type threats against his neighbors. GM Bareev, who was 25 when the USSR broke up, may not have had options other than to stay in chess. Certainly, as he got older, it was tougher to change careers, as it is for anyone.

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            • #21
              and Mark Bluvshtein did another very wise achievement - he got the GM title and went as far as he could go in the chess world before he pursued a career.

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              • #22
                Thanks Ian. Ive got to live another twenty years just to make sure he has every chance to become a tournament player. It will be a wonderful moment if we are siting beside each other someday in a tournament.
                At his baby shower I gave him a present of all the major chess pieces (no pawns because he could swallow them by accident) so he could get the feel of them and dream about them before actually playing.
                Merry Christmas Ian.
                Last edited by Hans Jung; Thursday, 23rd December, 2021, 11:20 AM.

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                • #23
                  I would argue that Mark could have been a top-20 player, maybe higher, had he wanted to keep at tournament chess, in his younger years.

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