Canadians in World Cups

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  • Canadians in World Cups

    Since the first World Cup in 1998, Canadians played the total of 21 matches and won 5 of them. Canadians were rating underdog in every(!) match they played. Some results:

    1. A.Kovalyov 4-2. Won 4 matches, 2 in 2015 and 2 in 2017 (including Anand). Lost twice to a very strong opponent: to Caruana in 2015 and to himself in 2017.

    2. A.Lesiege 1-2. Beat Vasquez in 2000, lost in the 2nd round in 2000 and in the 1st round in 2002.

    No other Canadians ever won a match.

    3. P.Charbonneau 0-2. Lost in 2004 and 2005.

    4. E.Hansen 0-2. Lost in 2011 and 2013.

    5. B.Sambuev 0-2. Lost in 2013 and 2017.

    6. K.Spraggett 0-1. Lost in 1998.

    7. I.Zugic 0-1. Lost in 2007.

    8. J.Hebert 0-1. Lost in 2009.

    9. M.Bluvshtein 0-1. Lost in 2011.

    10. T.Krnan 0-1. Lost in 2015.

    11. E.Bareev 0-1. Lost in 2019.
    Last edited by Victor Plotkin; Wednesday, 11th September, 2019, 02:34 PM.

  • #2
    Not to forget the great accomplishment of Kevin Spraggett defeating Alexei Sokolov (World #3 rated, 2645) 6.5-5.5 in 1998, then losing to Artur Yusupov 4-5 in 1989.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Erik Malmsten View Post
      Not to forget the great accomplishment of Kevin Spraggett defeating Alexei Sokolov (World #3 rated, 2645) 6.5-5.5 in 1998, then losing to Artur Yusupov 4-5 in 1989.
      Probably, in 1988 and not in 1998. In was a Candidate, not a World Cup. Off-topic...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Victor Plotkin View Post

        2. A.Lesiege 1-2. Beat Vasquez in 2000, lost in the 2nd round in 2000 and in the 1st round in 2002..
        Looking at Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_World_Cup
        Their count starts on 2000 with the First Chess World Cup and no Canadians played in it. "The FIDE World Cup 2000 was a 24-player Category XVI chess tournament played between 1 September and 13 September 2000 in Shenyang, China."

        In 2000 another playoff tournament took place ("The FIDE World Chess Championship 2000 was held in New Delhi, India, and Tehran, Iran")- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIDE_W...mpionship_2000 - Where Lesiege has played and performed as you wrote.

        1998 was also a direct WCC cycle (Anand went on Karpov in the final)

        Then 1999 (Khalifman year) shall be mentioned too (Spraggett loss to Yermolinsky in 1st round)


        Don't find me too picky - I read today that the Cup was held 9 or 10 times (including this year or without?). This does not match with your number, thus google/wiki is our friend :)


        Bareev was the second in 2000 Cup (lost finals to Anand)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Egidijus Zeromskis View Post

          Looking at Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_World_Cup
          Their count starts on 2000 with the First Chess World Cup and no Canadians played in it. "The FIDE World Cup 2000 was a 24-player Category XVI chess tournament played between 1 September and 13 September 2000 in Shenyang, China."

          In 2000 another playoff tournament took place ("The FIDE World Chess Championship 2000 was held in New Delhi, India, and Tehran, Iran")- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIDE_W...mpionship_2000 - Where Lesiege has played and performed as you wrote.

          1998 was also a direct WCC cycle (Anand went on Karpov in the final)

          Then 1999 (Khalifman year) shall be mentioned too (Spraggett loss to Yermolinsky in 1st round)


          Don't find me too picky - I read today that the Cup was held 9 or 10 times (including this year or without?). This does not match with your number, thus google/wiki is our friend :)


          Bareev was the second in 2000 Cup (lost finals to Anand)
          Indeed, these knock-out tournaments had different names. Instead of "World Cups" I should write "big elimination tournaments, there Canadians Qualify by winning the Zonal Championship or the American Continental."

          Obviously, Bareev played many times in these events, but only once as a Canadian.

          I agree about 1999 and K.Spraggett. So, Spraggett was 0-2 in knock-outs. The total is 5 wins in 22 matches.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Victor Plotkin View Post
            1. A.Kovalyov 4-2. Won 4 matches, 2 in 2015 and 2 in 2017 (including Anand). Lost twice to a very strong opponent: to Caruana in 2015 and to himself in 2017.
            Yes, he had a very tough pairing in 2017, being paired with himself must have been a very difficult challenge ;P

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