Canadian Online Streamers

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  • Canadian Online Streamers

    Hey I am soon going to be 67 years old so all this makes no sense to me :).

    I am watching Alexandra Botez and her sister playing blitz games (with odds) against a GM. It is called Botezlive. I have seen Alexandra at some tournaments so it is not as though I know nothing LOL.

    Go to: https://www.twitch.tv/botezlive

    So first I googled her name and Wikepedia has this:

    Alexandra Botez (born September 24, 1995) is an American-Canadian chess player and Twitch streamer. She holds the title Woman FIDE Master (WFM) and runs a YouTube chess channel together with her sister, Andrea Botez.

    I also found this at chess.com:

    I’m a 24-year-old chess content creator trying to make chess more fun and accessible for everyone. Want to know more about me? I'd appreciate you checking out my socials:

    Twitch Stream: twitch.tv/botezlive

    YouTube: youtube.com/c/botezlive

    Instagram: instagram.com/missbotez/

    Business inquiries: botezchess@gmail.com

    If you're trying to get in contact for non-business reasons, I do my best to reply to as many comments as possible on Twitch and YouTube


    Obviously this is a nice way to make a living!

    I know that Eric and Aman are doing something similar with Chessbrah.

    Are there other Canadians doing well with this medium?

    Can somebody fill me in please :)

    Larry
    Last edited by Larry Bevand; Monday, 24th August, 2020, 08:55 PM.

  • #2
    Yelizaveta Orlova

    Unacademy chess
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AH2tr7HkyMo

    https://www.twitch.tv/orlovachess

    https://orlovachess.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Larry Bevand View Post
      Obviously this is a nice way to make a living!
      This is a naive statement.

      It's not exactly "you turn on a camera and play blitz for a living". Building a streaming community is a brutally hard grind and puts immense pressure on the streamer to put out content every day; to be live for hours a day, while online trolls insult your play, your looks, whatever you're doing. Some people love it, but it's a very hard thing to do, and an even harder thing to be good at. It's very possible that this "nice way to make a living" ends up making you hate what was once a beloved hobby - instead of being something you can do for fun, it becomes something you're chained to your computer to do for hours a day with thousands of strangers watching and criticizing. No thanks.

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      • #4
        Well said David, Im glad someone spoke up about the cons. On the other hand I admire all of them for their perseverance. Lets hope they can find a silver lining in what they do daily. I would like to hear from Aman or Eric about how they feel if they are willing to share.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by David Ottosen View Post

          This is a naive statement.

          It's not exactly "you turn on a camera and play blitz for a living". Building a streaming community is a brutally hard grind and puts immense pressure on the streamer to put out content every day; to be live for hours a day, while online trolls insult your play, your looks, whatever you're doing. Some people love it, but it's a very hard thing to do, and an even harder thing to be good at. It's very possible that this "nice way to make a living" ends up making you hate what was once a beloved hobby - instead of being something you can do for fun, it becomes something you're chained to your computer to do for hours a day with thousands of strangers watching and criticizing. No thanks.
          That's called being a Debbie Downer, David. And nobody likes a Debbie Downer, mmkay.

          The VAST majority of streamers do it for fun, as a hobby, not to earn a living. You could compare it to the chess community, only a small group at the top "make a living" from doing it.

          I've watched hundreds of different streamers and found almost all of them have very vibrant, welcoming communities. So-called trolls are an incredibly small minority and are easily banned with the click of a mouse. On Twitch you can't comment in the chat without an account; "trolling" can't be done anonymously.

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          • #6
            After spending hundreds of hours watching streams I felt the itch to try broadcasting myself. You can catch me at https://www.twitch.tv/siddemania

            Right now I stream SpinChess - the ultimate mind/body workout: I play chess and spin on my stationary bike while keeping an elevated heart rate. I'm also planning on streaming CrunchChess, where I do 1 crunch (sit-up) per move played.

            I'm 1 follow away from 50 and reaching the "Affiliate" level. So go on and create a Twitch account, head on over to https://www.twitch.tv/siddemania, and give me a follow! Cheers!
            Last edited by Hugh Siddeley; Sunday, 30th August, 2020, 09:55 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by David Ottosen View Post

              This is a naive statement.

              It's not exactly "you turn on a camera and play blitz for a living". Building a streaming community is a brutally hard grind and puts immense pressure on the streamer to put out content every day; to be live for hours a day, while online trolls insult your play, your looks, whatever you're doing. Some people love it, but it's a very hard thing to do, and an even harder thing to be good at. It's very possible that this "nice way to make a living" ends up making you hate what was once a beloved hobby - instead of being something you can do for fun, it becomes something you're chained to your computer to do for hours a day with thousands of strangers watching and criticizing. No thanks.
              Hi David,

              Thanks for your perspective.

              It is a job. You have to like it or do something else.

              But any site that has 342 877 followers must be making money for somebody :).

              BTW, I just checked Chessbrah and saw that they have 139,492 followers...interesting!

              Orlova has 3 095 followers

              Larry
              Last edited by Larry Bevand; Sunday, 30th August, 2020, 06:04 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hugh Siddeley View Post

                The VAST majority of streamers do it for fun, as a hobby, not to earn a living. You could compare it to the chess community, only a small group at the top "make a living" from doing it.

                I've watched hundreds of different streamers and found almost all of them have very vibrant, welcoming communities. So-called trolls are an incredibly small minority and are easily banned with the click of a mouse. On Twitch you can't comment in the chat without an account; "trolling" can't be done anonymously.
                Doing it for fun? Definitely fun - you can stream or not stream, and do whatever you want and (in reality) no one is going to care that much.

                That wasn't in question - it was "it's a nice way to make a living" I took issue with. Once you move from getting followers to trying to get subscribers, the expectations move up a hundred notches. As Larry says - it becomes a job, except it's a job where you have a thousand bosses giving you performance evaluation every day.

                I didn't mean to be a downer - just wanted to point out that a stream like chessbrah is the product of 5 years of hard work by the guys. I watched them along with 50 other people in the early days when they were trying to get it going, and have watched regularly ever since. I have nothing but respect for the people who stream with the frequency of the Botii or Aman.

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