Games from Recent Events

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  • Games from Recent Events

    Games from Recent Events

    In our salad-green days, the arrival of Chess Review in the mail was a big event. It meant hours of reading enjoyment. The Game of the Month would be annotated by a grandmaster – Max Euwe and Svetozar Gligorich were two. And Games from Recent Events by Hans Kmoch featured great games from the last month with a literate introduction to each.

    Consider this from CR, February 1960. It is at the first of a Keres-Petrosyan Sicilian Defence:

    The Maroczy Bind is reminiscent of the Maginot Line in that the enemy is held at bay but only in one direction and that at the expense of mobility. If no means are found to support the formation so as to make effective a crossing into the enemy territory, the bind becomes a liability rather than an asset. That factor becomes apparent in this game with a fine and instructive performance by Black.

    The game from the Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates of 1959 and can be found at:

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1072759

    where it is titled “Crouching Tigran, Hidden Dragon”, which is not bad either.

    Now we can get the latest games within a day of their play. Here I give six games played within the last week, which have some interest. They are two of Vachier-Lagrave, two of Kramnik and one each of two favorite players, Jobava and Kamsky. Ah, if only there were another Hans Kmoch around to write the introductions!

    In the first game MVL loses to a player with an Elo 300 points below his. In the second he draws with Palac, who already has the superior position after 20 moves. The two games cost him 11 rating points and dropped him six places in World Rankings.

    Italian Teams 2015
    Civitanova Marche, Italy
    Round 5, May 1, 2015
    Altini, Nicola – Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime
    D85 Grunfeld, Exchange Variation

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Bd2 Nb6 6.Bg5 Bg7 7.Nf3 O-O 8.e3 Bf5 9.Be2 N8d7 10.Bh4 h6 11.O-O Nf6 12.Rc1 c6 13.Ne5 Re8 14.g4 Bc8 15.Bf3 Be6 16.Bg3 Nbd7 17.Na4 Rc8 18.b3 Qa5 19.Qe2 Nxe5 20.Bxe5 Nd7 21.Bg3 f6 22.Rfd1 Bf7 23.Nc5 Nxc5 24.Rxc5 Qb6 25.Qc2 e6 26.d5 exd5 27.Bxd5 Bxd5 28.Rdxd5 Rcd8 29.Qxg6 cxd5 30.Rc7 Qxc7 31.Bxc7 Rc8 32.Bf4 Re7 33.Bxh6 Rd8 34.h3 Rd6 35.Bf4 Rdd7 36.Bh6 Rd6 37.Bf4 Rdd7 38.Kg2 a6 39.Bh6 Rd6 40.Bf4 Rdd7 41.Kf3 d4 42.exd4 Rxd4 43.Be3 Rd5 44.h4 f5 45.g5 Rde5 46.Qb6 f4 47.Bxf4 Rf7 48.Kg3 Ref5 49.Be3 Be5+ 50.Kg4 1-0

    Italian Teams 2015
    Civitanova Marche, Italy
    Round 6, May 2, 2015
    Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime – Palac, Mladen
    B90 Sicilian, Najdorf, Adams Attack

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.h3 e5 7.Nde2 h5 8.g3 b5 9.Nd5 Nbd7 10.Bg5 Be7 11.Nxe7 Qxe7 12.Nc3 Bb7 13.Nd5 Bxd5 14.exd5 O-O 15.Bg2 Rfe8 16.O-O e4 17.c3 Qe5 18.Bf4 Qf5 19.Bxd6 Nxd5 20.Re1 1/2-1/2

    In the Russian Teams Shirov beats Kramnik in a Berlin. A bishops and knights endgame.

    Kramnik and Aronian are on the same team. Just how did that happen?

    From chess24.com: The Russian Team Championship was always going to be a fiercely strong event, but the bombshell announcement the day before it began that “Siberia” had added Vladimir Kramnik and Levon Aronian to their line-up added some stardust to the event. How did they end up there? Well, it’s all about money, of course, with the Novosibirsk-based concrete and coal-mining company RATM Holding bankrolling the new team.

    Russian Men’s Team Championships
    Sochi
    Round 1, May 1, 2015
    Shirov, Alexei – Kramnik, Vladimir
    C67 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence, Open Variation

    1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.O-O Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Be7 7.Bf1 Nf5 8.Nf3 d5 9.d4 O-O 10.c3 Re8 11.Bd3 Bd6 12.Rxe8+ Qxe8 13.Qc2 g6 14.Nbd2 b6 15.Nf1 Bd7 16.Bg5 Qf8 17.Re1 f6 18.Bd2 Re8 19.Ne3 Nce7 20.c4 dxc4 21.Nxc4 Nd5 22.Be4 Qf7 23.Nxd6 Nxd6 24.Bxd5 Qxd5 25.Qxc7 Nb5 26.Rxe8+ Bxe8 27.Qe7 Qf7 28.Qd8 Nc7 29.Bh6 Nd5 30.Qd6 Ne7 31.g4 Nc8 32.Qd8 Qe6 33.h3 Nd6 34.d5 Nf7 35.dxe6 Nxd8 36.Nd4 a6 37.f4 Nc6 38.Ne2 Ne7 39.Ng3 Bc6 40.f5 gxf5 41.gxf5 Bb5 42.Ne4 Nxf5 43.Nxf6+ Kh8 44.Bf8 a5 45.Kf2 Bc6 46.e7 Nd6 47.Kg3 Ne8 48.Ng4 h5 49.Ne5 Bd5 50.a3 Kg8 51.Kf4 Bb3 52.Kg5 Bd1 53.Nc4 Kf7 54.Nxb6 Nd6 55.Nd5 Ne4+ 56.Kh4 a4 57.Nc3 Nxc3 58.bxc3 Be2 59.Kg5 Ke8 60.h4 Kd7 61.Kf6 Bc4 62.Bh6 Ke8 63.Bf4 Bf7 64.Bg5 Bb3 65.Ke5 Kd7 66.Kd4 Bf7 67.Kc5 Kc7 68.c4 Be8 69.Kd5 Kd7 70.c5 Bg6 71.c6+ Kc7 72.Bf4+ Kc8 73.Ke6 Bf7+ 74.Kf6 Be8 75.c7 Kd7 76.Kg7 1-0

    In the second round Kramnik beat Svidler. From the photo on the chess24 site, it looks like Svidler’s broken arm has healed.

    Russian Men’s Team Championships
    Sochi
    Round 2, May 2, 2015
    Kramnik, Vladimir – Svidler, Peter
    A07 Reti, KIA

    1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 g6 4.b3 Bg7 5.Bb2 c5 6.c4 d4 7.b4 Nfd7 8.O-O Nc6 9.bxc5 O-O 10.d3 Nxc5 11.Nbd2 Rb8 12.Ba3 Qa5 13.Qc1 Na4 14.Nb3 Qc7 15.Qc2 Bd7 16.Rae1 Rfd8 17.e3 dxe3 18.fxe3 h6 19.d4 Bf5 20.e4 Bg4 21.e5 Nb6 22.Nh4 Nxd4 23.Qf2 Qxc4 24.Re4 Be6 25.Nxd4 Bd5 26.Ne6 Bxe6 27.Rxc4 Nxc4 28.Bxe7 Rd2 29.Qxa7 Bxe5 30.Nf3 Bc7 1-0

    Russian Men’s Team Championships
    Sochi
    Round 1, May 1, 2015
    Jobava, Baadur – Zvaginsev, Vadim
    A21 English, Kramnik-Shirov Counter-Attack

    1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4 3.e4 Nf6 4.Bd3 O-O 5.Nge2 Bc5 6.O-O a6 7.Bc2 Nc6 8.h3 b5 9.d3 bxc4 10.dxc4 h6 11.Rb1 Rb8 12.a3 a5 13.Bd2 d6 14.Nd5 Bd7 15.Bc3 Ra8 16.Kh1 Nh7 17.b4 axb4 18.axb4 Ba7 19.Qd3 f5 20.c5 dxc5 21.bxc5 fxe4 22.Qe3 Ng5 23.Rfd1 Bxh3 24.Ba4 Bd7 25.Nb6 Bxb6 26.Bxc6 Bxc5 27.Qxc5 Ne6 28.Bd5 Qh4+ 29.Kg1 Kh8 30.Bxe6 Bxe6 31.Bxe5 1-0

    Russian Men’s Team Championships
    Sochi
    Round 1, May 1, 2015
    Sjugirov, Sanan – Kamsky, Gata
    D70 Neo-Grunfeld Defence

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.f3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nb6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.Be3 Nc6 8.Bb5 O-O 9.Nge2 a6 10.Bxc6 bxc6 11.Qc2 Nc4 12.Bf2 e5 13.Na4 Be6 14.Nc5 Qb8 15.Rc1 exd4 16.Nxd4 Qb4+ 17.Ke2 Bd5 18.b3 Na3 19.Qc3 Qxc3 20.Rxc3 Rfe8 21.g4 Nb5 22.Rd3 Bf8 23.Rc1 Nxd4+ 24.Rxd4 f5 25.Kd3 fxe4+ 26.fxe4 Be6 27.Nxe6 Rxe6 28.Bg3 c5 29.Rd5 Rae8 30.e5 Rc6 31.Rd7 Be7 32.Ke4 a5 33.Rc4 Kf7 34.Bh4 Ke6 35.Rxe7+ Rxe7 36.Bxe7 Kxe7 37.Kd5 Ra6 38.Rxc5 Ra7 39.Rc6 Rb7 40.Kc5 Kd7 41.h3 Rb4 42.e6+ Kc8 43.Ra6 Kd8 44.Rxa5 Re4 45.Ra8+ Ke7 46.Rc8 1-0

  • #2
    Re: Games from Recent Events

    Games from Recent Events

    Baadur Jobava was playing Dmitry Jakovenko in the Russian Teams. The computer evaluation of Jobava’s position went up and down from equal to a sizeable advantage for White.

    Then, disaster struck. When his queen was attacked with 45…Rd8, he moved 46. Qe3 and after 46…g5 resigned as his rook is gone. Nasty things these pawn forks.

    Russian Teams Championship
    Sochi
    Round Five, May 5, 2015
    Jobava, Baadur – Jakovenko, Dmitry
    C53 Giuoco Piano

    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. h3 Bd7 10. Ba4 f6 11. O-O fxe5 12. dxe5 Ne7 13. Nbd2 Nxd2 14. Bxd2 O-O 15. Bc2 Bf5 16. a4 a5 17. Ra3 Nc6 18. Bxf5 Rxf5 19. Re1 Nd4 20. g4 Rf8 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Be3 Bxb2 23. Rd3 Bxe5 24. Rxd5 Bd6 25. Qb3 Kh8 26. Qxb7 Qe8 27. Qb1 Rb8 28. Qc2 Rb4 29. Rxa5 Re4 30. Rb5 c5 31. Rb6 Bf4 32. Qxc5 Bxe3 33. Rxe3 Rxe3 34. fxe3 Qf7 35. Qf5 Qe8 36. Qd3 Qxa4 37. Rb1 Qa7 38. Rf1 Re8 39. Qd4 Qe7 40. Kg2 h6 41. Rf3 Qb7 42. h4 Rf8 43. e4 Re8 44. Rf4 Qc7 45. Kg3 Rd8 46. Qe3 g5 0-1

    47. Kf3 gxf4 48. Qa3 Qe5 49. Qb4 Rc8 50. Kg2 Rc2+ 51. Kf3 Kg7 52. Qb7+ Rc7 53. Qb4 Rc3+ 54. Kf2 f3 55. Qb7+ Rc7 56. Qb4 Rc2+ 57. Ke3 Rc3+ 58. Kd2 f2 59. Qxc3 Qxc3+ 60. Kxc3 f1Q 61. g5 Qe1+ 62. Kd3 Qxh4 63. gxh6+ Kf6 64. h7 Qxh7

    47. Kg2 gxf4 48. Qf2 Qc3 49. Qxf4 Rd2+ 50. Qxd2 Qxd2+ 51. Kf3 Qd3+ 52. Kf4 Kg7 53. e5 Qf1+ 54. Kg3 Qe1+ 55. Kh3 Qxe5 56. Kg2 Qe4+ 57. Kg3 Kg6 58. h5+ Kg7 59. Kh3 Qf4 60. Kg2 Qxg4+ 61. Kf1 Qxh5 62. Kf2 Kg6 63. Kf1

    47. Qf2 gxf4+ 48. Kg2 Qc3 49. Qxf4 Rd2+ 50. Qxd2 Qxd2+ 51. Kf3 Qd3+ 52. Kf4 Kg7 53. e5 Kf7 54. e6+ Kxe6 55. g5 hxg5+ 56. Kxg5

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Games from Recent Events

      Actually Ive been watching Hou Yifans play in her ongoing tournament (in Azerbaijan?) with mixed results. I assume she is still learning alot and she has been getting some good (and painful) lessons. One things for sure her games are always interesting fights.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Games from Recent Events

        Games from Recent Events

        The Giri Nepal Charity Simul on chess.com

        Anish Giri’s charity simultaneous for the earthquake relief in Nepal took place on Sunday, May 10, 2015. Anish scored 9-1 and raised over $5000 in donations.

        The event is written up at:

        http://www.chess.com/news/anish-giri...ser-simul-6407

        The games were all recorded. Given here is a theoretical King’s Indian, the game Anish lost and the quickest game to finish.

        http://www.chess.com/members/view/AnishGiri#games

        Nepal Charity Simul
        May 10, 2015
        bigville – Giri, Anish
        E99 King’s Indian, Orthodox, Aronin-Taimanov, Main Line

        1.d4 g6 2.c4 Bg7 3.e4 d6 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.Nf3 O-O 6.Be2 e5 7.O-O Nc6 8.d5 Ne7 9.Ne1 Nd7 10.Be3 f5 11.f3 f4 12.Bf2 g5 13.Nd3 b6 14.b4 Ng6 15.c5 Nf6 16.Rc1 Rf7 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.Nb5 g4 19.Rc6 Bf8 20.Nb2 g3 21.Be1 Nh5 22.Rxc8 gxh2+ 23.Kh1 Rxc8 24.Nc4 a6 25.Nba3 Be7 26.Bf2 Bh4 27.Qe1 Bxf2 0-1

        Nepal Charity Simul
        May 10, 2015
        chessmaniac3298 – Giri, Anish
        D72 Neo-Grunfeld, 5. cxd5, Main Line

        1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 d5 5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.e4 Nb6 7.Ne2 c5 8.d5 O-O 9.O-O e6 10.Nec3 Na6 11.a4 exd5 12.exd5 Bf5 13.Na3 h5 14.Be3 Re8 15.Qb3 Bd3 16.Rfe1 c4 17.Qb5 Nc7 18.Bxb6 axb6 19.Qxb6 Rxe1+ 20.Rxe1 Ne8 21.Qxd8 Rxd8 22.Nab5 Kf8 23.Be4 Nd6 24.Nxd6 Rxd6 25.Re3 Bd4 26.Nb5 Bxe3 27.Nxd6 Bc1 28.Bxd3 cxd3 29.Kf1 Bxb2 30.Nxb7 Ke7 31.d6+ Kd7 32.a5 Bd4 33.a6 Kc6 34.Ke1 f5 35.f4 Be3 36.Na5+ Kb5 37.d7 Bb6 38.a7 1-0

        Nepal Charity Simul
        May 10, 2015
        Giri, Anish – Michael8850
        C42 Petrov’s Defence

        1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.d3 Nc6 4.Nbd2 Bc5 5.Be2 Bxf2+ 6.Kxf2 Ng4+ 7.Kg1 Ne3 8.Qe1 Nxc2 9.Qg3 Nxa1 10.Qxg7 Rf8 11.Nc4 f6 12.Nfxe5 Qe7 13.Bh5+ Kd8 14.Nf7+ Rxf7 15.Bxf7 d5 16.Qg8+ Kd7 17.Bxd5 Nc2 18.Bh6 Qc5+ 19.Kf1 Ne5 20.Nxe5+ fxe5 21.Qe6+ Kd8 22.Bg5+ Qe7 23.Qxe7# 1-0

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Games from Recent Events

          Games from Recent Events

          June 7, 2015

          The French Teams Championship is on now at Grau-du-Roi (30 May – 9 June).

          A game from Round Four is being discussed on the English Chess Forum:

          French Teams, June 2015 Round 4
          Skripchenko, Almira – Benmesbah, Natacha
          B22 Sicilian Defense, Alapin Variation

          1.e4 c5 2.c3 d5 3.exd5 Qxd5 4.d4 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bf5 6.Be3 cxd4 7.Nxd4 O-O-O 8.Qa4 Bd7 9.Nd2 Nxd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Kb8 12.O-O-O f6 13.Nc4 Nh6 14.Nb6 Bf5 15.Be5+ fxe5 16.Rxd8+ Kc7 17.Rxf8 Rxf8 18.Nd5+ Kd6 19.Ne3 Be6 20.Bc4 Bxc4 21.Nxc4+ Kd5 22.Ne3+ Ke4 23.Re1 Kf4 24.f3 Rd8 25.Nc4 Nf7 26.a4 Rc8 27.Ne3 Rd8 28.Nc4 Rc8 29.Re4+ Kf5 30.h4 Kf6 31.Ne3 Rd8 32.Kc2 h5 33.Rc4 Rd7 34.a5 g5 35.hxg5+ Kxg5 36.g3 e6 37.Rc8 Kf6 38.Nc4 Ke7 39.Rg8 Kf6 40.Nd2 Nd6 41.Ne4+ Nxe4 42.fxe4 Rh7 43.Kd3 Ke7 44.Kc4 Kd6 45.Kb5 h4 46.gxh4 Rxh4 47.Rg7 Rxe4 48.Rxb7 Re2 49.b4 e4 50.Rxa7 e3 51.Rh7 Rf2 52.Rh3 e2 53.Rd3+ Kc7 54.Re3 e5 55.Kc4 e4 56.Kd4 1-0

          See:

          http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1793292

          After 52.Rh3, Black pushed the pawn and that led to disaster. But what if she played 52…Rf5+ first? Then 53.Kb6 e2 54.Rd3+ Rd5 55.Re3 Re5 56.Rxe2 Rxe2 57.c4 e5 58.a6 e4 and Bob’s your uncle.

          The notorious Sebastien Feller is playing as well as those two famous Frenchmen So and Giri. Worth a look at:

          http://grauduroi2015.ffechecs.org/li...015/live1.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Games from Recent Events

            Games from Recent Events

            June 8, 2015

            A shocker from Round Ten of the French Teams:

            French Top 12 Club Championships 2015
            Round Ten
            June 8, 2015
            So, Wesley – Fedorchuk, Sergey
            A27 English, Three Knights System

            1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bc5 4. a3 d6 5. b4 Bb6 6. e3 Bg4 7. h3 Bh5 8. g4 Bg6 9. d4 exd4 10. exd4 a6 11. Bg2 h5 12. O-O hxg4 13. hxg4 Qd7 14. Re1+ Kf8 15. c5 Ba7 16. d5 Nce7 17. Qd4 Rd8 18. Bb2 f6 19. Qf4 Nh6 20. g5 Qg4 21. Qd2 Nf7 22. gxf6 gxf6 23. Qd4 Ne5 24. Qxg4 Nxg4 25. Nd4 Kf7 26. Ne6 Rdg8 27. Nxc7 Ne5 28. cxd6 Nc8 29. d7 Nf3+ 30. Kf1 Bd3+ 31. Re2 Rh1+ 0-1

            Fedorchuk has an Elo of 2657, So one of 2778.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Games from Recent Events

              Originally posted by Wayne Komer View Post
              Games from Recent Events

              June 8, 2015

              A shocker from Round Ten of the French Teams:

              French Top 12 Club Championships 2015
              Round Ten
              June 8, 2015
              So, Wesley – Fedorchuk, Sergey
              A27 English, Three Knights System

              1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 Bc5 4. a3 d6 5. b4 Bb6 6. e3 Bg4 7. h3 Bh5 8. g4 Bg6 9. d4 exd4 10. exd4 a6 11. Bg2 h5 12. O-O hxg4 13. hxg4 Qd7 14. Re1+ Kf8 15. c5 Ba7 16. d5 Nce7 17. Qd4 Rd8 18. Bb2 f6 19. Qf4 Nh6 20. g5 Qg4 21. Qd2 Nf7 22. gxf6 gxf6 23. Qd4 Ne5 24. Qxg4 Nxg4 25. Nd4 Kf7 26. Ne6 Rdg8 27. Nxc7 Ne5 28. cxd6 Nc8 29. d7 Nf3+ 30. Kf1 Bd3+ 31. Re2 Rh1+ 0-1

              Fedorchuk has an Elo of 2657, So one of 2778.
              That's Chessgames.com's "So Sad" 'Game of the Day' today.

              http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1794769

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Games from Recent Events

                Games from Recent Events

                Navara – So Match

                The traditional CEZ Chess Trophy 2015 Festival is being held from 12-16th June in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic.

                The highlight of the festival is a four-game match between World No. 14 David Navara (2751) and World No. 9, Wesley So (2778).

                The second day of the festival started with the book launch of David Navara’s My Chess World. Unfortunately, for the moment, it only exists in the Czech edition. One would like to know a little of that language because at the official site, they have ads for books about the Carlsbad Tournaments, Salo Flohr, Karel Opocensky and games of Fischer against Czech opponents.

                http://praguechess.cz/knihy-vydane.php?langue=en

                The blurb on the Opocensky book:

                He defeated the world champion Alexander Alekhine and they became friends. Behind the chessboard he met with legends of the end 19th century and also with generation that was famous in seventies of twentieth century. He founded the chess news agency, was an arbiter of world championship matches and the first Czech chess professional. Master Karel Opocensky also loved cigars, good French wine and women. The story of his colourful life is complemented by many previously unpublished photos, including pictures from an album of his daughter Eve and thirty games commented by grandmaster Vlastimil Hort. It has been issued by Prague chess society. Prague 2011.

                Anyway, back to our sheep. The first game had So with the better of it and missing a chance to win with 58…f3 after Navara played 58.Kg6. The resulting endgame of opposite coloured bishops and pawns went on to the 94th move.

                The second game was fairly equal into the 40s and then a few inaccuracies by Black and White garnered the point. I think a famous chess writer has said that you should not say “equal game” but that the players had “equal chances”.

                Navara-So Match, Prague
                Game 1, June 13, 2015
                Navara,David – So, Wesley
                B90 Sicilian, Najdorf, Adams Attack

                1.Nf3 c5 2.e4 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.h3 e5 7.Nb3 Be6 8.Be3 Be7 9.f4 exf4 10.Bxf4 Nc6 11.Qe2 Nd7 12.O-O-O Nce5 13.Kb1 O-O 14.g4 Rc8 15.Qe3 Re8 16.Nd4 Qa5 17.a3 Bf8 18.Nf5 Nb6 19.Qd4 Nec4 20.Bxc4 Nxc4 21.Nxd6 Nxa3+ 22.bxa3 Rxc3 23.Qb4 Qxb4+ 24.axb4 Bxd6 25.Bxd6 Rec8 26.Rh2 Re3 27.Rd4 Rc4 28.Rxc4 Bxc4 29.e5 h6 30.Kc1 Kh7 31.Kd2 Rf3 32.Bc5 h5 33.gxh5 Rf5 34.Ke3 Rxh5 35.h4 Be6 36.Bd6 b6 37.Bc7 a5 38.Bxb6 Rxe5+ 39.Kd4 Rd5+ 40.Kc3 axb4+ 41.Kxb4 Rh5 42.Bd8 Re5 43.Rf2 Re4+ 44.Kc3 Kh6 45.Kd3 Rc4 46.Rf4 Rxf4 47.Bg5+ Kh5 48.Bxf4 Kxh4 49.Be5 g5 50.Bf6 Kh5 51.Ke4 Kg6 52.Be5 f6 53.Bc7 Kh5 54.Bd8 f5+ 55.Ke5 Bc8 56.Kf6 f4 57.c4 Kg4 58.Kg6 Bf5+ 59.Kf6 Bd3 60.Bb6 Bxc4 61.Bc5 Bd3 62.Bb6 Kh4 63.Bf2+ Kh5 64.Bb6 Ba6 65.Bc5 Bc8 66.Bb6 Kg4 67.Bc5 Bd7 68.Bb6 Bf5 69.Bc5 Bc8 70.Bb6 f3 71.Be3 Bd7 72.Kg6 Be8+ 73.Kf6 Bh5 74.Bb6 Bf7 75.Bc5 Bb3 76.Be3 Bd1 77.Kg6 Bc2+ 78.Kf6 Ba4 79.Kg6 Bd7 80.Kf6 Bf5 81.Ke5 Bc8 82.Kf6 Kh5 83.Bf2 Bd7 84.Be3 Bh3 85.Bf2 Kg4 86.Be3 Bg2 87.Kg6 Bf1 88.Kf6 Bh3 89.Kg6 Bf1 90.Kf6 Bd3 91.Bb6 Bh7 92.Be3 Bf5 93.Ke5 Bc2 94.Kf6 Bd3 0.5-0.5

                Navara-So Match, Prague
                Game 2, June 14, 2015
                So, Wesley – Navara, David
                A29 English, Bremen

                1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e5 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.g3 d5 5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.Bg2 Nb6 7.O-O Be7 8.d3 O-O 9.a3 Be6 10.Be3 Nd5 11.Nxd5 Bxd5 12.Rc1 Bd6 13.Qa4 Qe8 14.Rfe1 Ne7 15.Qxe8 Rfxe8 16.Bc5 Nc6 17.b4 a6 18.Nd2 Bxg2 19.Kxg2 Re7 20.Ne4 Rd7 21.g4 Nd8 22.Bxd6 cxd6 23.Nc3 d5 24.Na4 Rb8 25.e3 f6 26.f4 g6 27.Rc2 Ne6 28.f5 gxf5 29.gxf5 Ng7 30.Rf1 d4 31.e4 Nh5 32.Nb6 Rg7+ 33.Kf3 Nf4 34.Rfc1 Rf8 35.Rc8 Rf7 36.Rg1+ Kh8 37.Rc2 Rd8 38.Nd5 Nxd5 39.exd5 Rfd7 40.Rgc1 Rxd5 41.Rc8 Kg7 42.Rxd8 Rxd8 43.Rc7+ Kh6 44.Rxb7 Rc8 45.h4 Rc1 46.Ke4 Re1+ 47.Kd5 e4 48.Re7 Ra1 49.Rxe4 Rxa3 50.Rxd4 Kh5 51.Ke6 a5 52.bxa5 Rxa5 53.Kxf6 h6 54.Rd7 Ra4 55.Ke7 Rd4 56.f6 1-0

                Standing after two games of four – So 1.5, Navara 0.5

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Games from Recent Events

                  Games from Recent Events

                  July 3, 2015

                  Everyone is talking about this game today.

                  http://www.chess.com/news/wei-yi-pla...rtal-game-2240

                  Peter Doggers in ChessVibes says this:

                  GM Wei Yi might just have played the 21st-century version of the Immortal Game. The Chinese super-talent beat Cuban GM Lazaro Bruzon just brilliantly today in Danzhou.

                  Yesterday the sixth edition of the annual tournament in Danzhou started. This website has a lot of information (in Chinese), and according to Google Translate it is called the “Rural Credit Cup.” The prize fund is 100,000 yuan (€14,500/$16,100).

                  Again, it is a 10-player round robin with this year GMs Ding Liren (2749), Yu Yangyi (2736), Wei Yi (2724), Wang Yue (2716), Ni Hua (2703), Bu Xiangzhi (2695), Lazaro Bruzon Batista (2669), Krishnan Sasikiran (2640), Lu Shanglei (2595) and IM Wang Chen (2521).

                  Most chess columnists will have already delivered their latest article for tomorrow's newspaper, but they don't need to think longer for next week's topic. Today Chinese super talent Wei Yi played a 21st-century Immortal (or Evergreen) Game, in round 2 against Cuban Bruzon.

                  After quite a normal opening (a Classical Scheveningen), White suddenly sacrifices a rook on f7 and then also gives up a bishop to drag the enemy king towards him. The beauty of this classic king hunt lies in the many “silent” moves played.

                  Sixth Danzhou International
                  Round 2 July 3, 2015
                  Wei Yi – Bruzon Batista, Lazaro
                  B85 Sicilian, Scheveningen, Classical Main Line

                  1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.Nc3 a6 4.Be2 Nc6 5.d4 cxd4 6.Nxd4 Qc7 7.O-O Nf6 8.Be3 Be7 9.f4 d6 10.Kh1 O-O 11.Qe1 Nxd4 12.Bxd4 b5 13.Qg3 Bb7 14.a3 Rad8 15.Rae1 Rd7 16.Bd3 Qd8 17.Qh3 g6 18.f5 e5 19.Be3 Re8 20.fxg6 hxg6 21.Nd5 Nxd5 22.Rxf7 Kxf7 23.Qh7+ Ke6 24.exd5+ Kxd5 25.Be4+ Kxe4 26.Qf7 Bf6 27.Bd2+ Kd4 28.Be3+ Ke4 29.Qb3 Kf5 30.Rf1+ Kg4 31.Qd3 Bxg2+ 32.Kxg2 Qa8+ 33.Kg1 Bg5 34.Qe2+ Kh4 35.Bf2+ Kh3 36.Be1 1-0

                  Fischer was 13 years old on October 17, 1956, when he played his Immortal vs Donald Byrne. Wei Yi is 16, born on June 2, 1999.
                  Last edited by Wayne Komer; Friday, 3rd July, 2015, 01:19 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Games from Recent Events

                    Lu Shanglei, who turned 20 today, clearly did not make an auspicious start to his vicenarian status, losing badly to Ding Liren in just 20 moves ):

                    http://www.chessbomb.com/arena/2015-...en-Lu_Shanglei

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Games from Recent Events

                      Sipke Ernst surely played one of the year's worst moves by a GM today at the Dutch Championship versus Anish Giri. His King only had 2 square's after Giri's check on h5 (30. ...Qh5). Moving the King to g1 left the position equal while g3 was essentially a forced mate. Sipke picked the latter and resigned one move later ):

                      http://www.chessbomb.com/arena/2015-...pke-Giri_Anish

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Games from Recent Events

                        Games from Recent Events

                        July 10, 2015

                        The Dutch Championship 2015 is taking place from July 4 to July 12 at the Manor Hotel in Amsterdam.

                        It is an 8-player single round-robin tournament with: Sergey Tiviakov, Erwin L’Ami, Robin van Kampen, Anish Giri, Loek van Wely, Benjamin Bok, Sipke Ernst and Roeland Pruijssers.

                        After Round Five Giri leads with 4.0/5 followed by Van Wely 3.5, Bok 3.0, Van Kampen 2.5, Tiviakov 2.0, L’Ami 2.0, Ernst 2.0 and Pruijssers 1.0.

                        There is a photo on the Official Site of Jan Timman’s daughter Dehlia. She is a lawyer and an economist, born in 1979, during the Hoogovens Chess Tournament in which her father was playing.

                        She was at the opening ceremonies on July 4.

                        http://www.nkschaken.nl

                        The following game was played in Round 2. Robin is comfortably ahead but Loek is bearing down on the white King with his g-pawn. Robin takes the black bishop and disaster ensues.

                        NK 2015
                        Round 2.1, July 6, 2015
                        Van Kampen, Robin – Van Wely, Loek
                        B42 Sicilian, Kan, Polugaievsky Variation

                        1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Bd3 Bc5 6.Nb3 Be7 7.Qg4 g6 8.Qe2 d6 9.a4 Nc6 10.O-O Ne5 11.Nc3 Nf6 12.Bh6 Nfg4 13.Bd2 O-O 14.a5 Bd7 15.f4 Nxd3 16.cxd3 Nf6 17.Be3 e5 18.d4 Bg4 19.Qd3 exf4 20.Rxf4 Bd7 21.h3 b5 22.axb6 Qxb6 23.Na5 Rfc8 24.Rf2 Bb5 25.Qd1 Qd8 26.Qf3 Qe8 27.Bg5 Rxc3 28.bxc3 Nxe4 29.Bxe7 Qxe7 30.c4 Be8 31.Rb2 f5 32.Rb7 Qg5 33.Re1 Qd2 34.Rxe4 fxe4 35.Qf6 Qh6 36.Qe6+ Kh8 37.Qf6+ Kg8 38.Qe6+ Kh8 39.Qxd6 Ba4 40.Qe5+ Kg8 41.Qxe4 Re8 42.Qf3 g5 43.c5 Qe6 44.Qd3 Qf6 45.Qc4+ Kh8 46.Rf7 Qg6 47.Rf2 g4 48.Qxa4 Re1+ 49.Rf1 gxh3 50.Qc6 Rxf1+ 51.Kh2 Qxg2+ 52.Qxg2 hxg2 53.Kxg2 Rd1 54.Nc6 Kg7 55.Kf3 Kf6 56.Ke2 Rc1 57.Nb8 a5 58.d5 Ke7 59.d6+ Ke6 60.Na6 h5 61.Kd2 Rg1 62.Nc7+ Kd7 63.Nd5 h4 64.Nf6+ Kc6 65.d7 Kc7 66.c6 Rg5 67.Ke3 Rc5 0-1

                        Instead of 48.Qxa4, 48.Qc3 followed by 48...gxh3 49.Nc4 hxg2 50.d5+ Qg7 51.Qxg7+ Kxg7 52.Rxg2+ Kf6 53.Rf2+ Ke7 54.Nd6 Rg8+ 55.Kh2 Be8 56.Re2+ Kd8 57.Nb7+ Kd7 58.c6+ Kc7

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Games from Recent Events

                          Games from Recent Events

                          July 17, 2015

                          Lake Sevan

                          This by David Martinez in chess24.com yesterday:

                          Duda and Antón lead Lake Sevan

                          Since July 12th the beautiful Martuni, on the shores of Lake Sevan, Armenia, has been the setting for an extraordinary closed tournament featuring some of the world's top juniors. After four rounds (of nine) the leaders on three points are Poland's Jan-Krzysztof Duda and Spain's David Antón. They face a showdown in Round 5, while half a point behind are Vladislav Artemiev, Samuel Ter Sahakyan and Vidit Gujrathi.

                          It's been obvious since the very first round that the organizers, led by Armenian Chess Academy President GM Smbat Lputian, have done a great job in selecting the players. The participants are young, combative and perfectly prepared to provide first-rate chess. Only five of the 20 games so far have ended in draws, and the players are demonstrating the best facets of their styles.

                          Samuel Sevian, the 14-year-old grandmaster from the United States, is playing but, so far, has not stood out from his peers.

                          The game that everyone is talking about was played in Round Six today. India’s 20-year-old star Vidit Gujrathi blunders mate-in-one after five minutes thought. He had 17 minutes left on his clock.

                          Lake Sevan 2015
                          Round Six, July 17, 2015
                          Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi – Hovhannisyan, Robert
                          D43 QGD, Semi-Slav

                          1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 dxc4 7.e4 g5 8.Bg3 b5 9.Be2 b4 10.Na4 Nxe4 11.Be5 Nf6 12.Rc1 Bg7 13.Nc5 Nbd7 14.Nxd7 Qxd7 15.h4 g4 16.Nd2 Ba6 17.Bxg4 c3 18.bxc3 bxc3 19.Nb3 Qd5 20.Bf3 Qc4 21.Rh3 Qf1# 0-1

                          21.Rc2 O-O 22.Qc1 was indicated. 21.Na5 looks even better.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Games from Recent Events

                            Games from Recent Events

                            July 17, 2015

                            Mark Crowther in The Week in Chess:

                            The China-Russia Match takes place in Yinzhou, China 14th to 20th July 2015. 5 round Scheveningen system event for men and women's teams. If tied then the result of the blitz match on the opening day will act as a tie-break. Teams Men: China: Yu Yangyi, Wei Yi, Bu Xiangzhi, Lu Shanglei, Wang Chen Russia: Svidler, Vitiugov, Matlakov, Fedoseev and Dubov. Women: China: Tan Zhongyi, Shen Yang, Huang Qian, Lei Tingjie, Ding Yixin. Russia: Gunina, Girya, Goryachkina, Pogonina, Kashlinskaya.

                            If you are looking at a map for Yinzhou, it is south of Shanghai and west of the East China Sea. The area is referred to as Yinzhou District, Ningbo City.

                            The main attraction appears to be Tiantong Temple, one of the most important Zen Buddhist temples; it was originally built during the Western Jin Dynasty around 300 AD (some date it between 265-316). A very large complex of buildings, its former total of 999 rooms has now shrunk to 730 today, arranged in twenty groups of buildings rising up the mountain slope.

                            Colin McGourty says in chess24.com:

                            China has stolen Russia’s thunder recently, winning the 2014 Olympiad and the 2015 World Team Championship, and in Wei Yi they have the hottest prospect in world chess. Russia still remains the country to beat, though, boasting 230 grandmasters to China’s 36 (and 519 international masters to China’s 32!). You couldn’t, therefore, ask for a more exciting match, and the current event has a great mix of youth and experience.

                            For Russia, Svidler and Vitiugov bring experience, Fedoseev and Dubov are numbers 3 and 4 on the latest FIDE junior rating list, while Matlakov is still only 24 years old.

                            The Chinese team features Wei Yi. It also includes the current World Junior Champion Lu Shanglei and 21-year-old Yu Yangyi, the winner of the Qatar Masters and, most recently, the Capablanca Memorial.

                            After three rounds the score is China 9 points, Russia 6 points.

                            Two games of interest – Wei Yi’s win in Round 1 and Svidler’s win against him in Round 2. It is best to beat these prodigies when they are young, because you may not have as good a chance ever again!

                            China – Russia Match 2015
                            Ningbo, China
                            Round 1, July 15, 2015
                            Fedoseev, Vladimir – Wei, Yi
                            D87 Grunfeld, Exchange, Spassky Variation

                            1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 O-O 9.Be3 Nc6 10.Rc1 Qc7 11.h4 Rd8 12.h5 b5 13.Bd5 e6 14.Bxc6 Qxc6 15.hxg6 fxg6 16.f3 a5 17.Kf2 Ba6 18.Qg1 b4 19.Qh2 h5 20.Nf4 Qe8 21.Qg3 bxc3 22.Nxg6 cxd4 23.Bf4 Qb5 24.e5 Kf7 25.Qg5 Qe2+ 26.Kg3 Rd7 27.Rxh5 Qd3 28.Nh4 Rg8 29.Kh2 Bh8 30.Qh6 Bg7 31.Qg5 Bc4 32.Re1 Bf8 33.Qf6+ Ke8 34.Bg5 Be7 35.Qh6 Bf8 36.Qf6 Be7 37.Qh6 Bd5 38.Bf6 Bf8 39.Qf4 Qd2 40.Qxd2 cxd2 41.Rd1 Bb4 42.Bg5 Rxg5 43.Rxg5 Bxa2 44.Rg8+ Kf7 45.Rb8 Bb3 0-1

                            China – Russia Match 2015
                            Ningbo, China
                            Round 2, July 16, 2015
                            Wei, Yi – Svidler, Peter
                            C88 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Anti-Marshall

                            1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 O-O 8.a4 b4 9.d4 d6 10.dxe5 dxe5 11.Nbd2 Bc5 12.h3 h6 13.Qe2 Qe7 14.a5 Be6 15.Bc4 Nh5 16.Bxe6 Qxe6 17.Qc4 Qxc4 18.Nxc4 Rfe8 19.Be3 Bxe3 20.Nxe3 Nf4 21.Rad1 Red8 22.h4 f6 23.Kf1 h5 24.Nc4 Kf7 25.g3 Ne6 26.Rd5 Ne7 27.Rd2 Nc5 28.c3 bxc3 29.bxc3 Ke6 30.Rxd8 Rxd8 31.Nfd2 Nc6 32.Ke2 Na7 33.Na3 Rb8 34.Nac4 Nb5 35.Rc1 Na4 36.Nb1 g6 37.f4 Nc5 38.Nbd2 exf4 39.gxf4 Rd8 40.f5+ gxf5 41.exf5+ Kxf5 42.Ne3+ Ke6 43.Rc2 Kf7 44.Nf3 Ne4 45.Nd1 Re8 46.Kf1 c5 47.Nd2 Kg6 48.Nc4 Ng3+ 49.Kf2 Nf5 50.Nde3 Nxh4 51.Rc1 Re4 52.Nd2 Rf4+ 53.Ke2 Nf5 54.Rg1+ Kf7 55.Nd5 Ra4 56.Kd3 Rh4 57.Nf3 c4+ 58.Kd2 Re4 59.Rf1 Re6 60.Kc1 Rd6 61.Nb6 Ne3 62.Re1 Rd3 63.Na4 Ng4 64.Nh4 Nxc3 65.Nc5 Rd5 66.Nxa6 Rxa5 67.Nb4 Na2+ 0-1

                            If 68.Nxa2 Rxa2 69.Re4 Ne5 70.Re3 Rf2 71.Kd1 Rf4 72.Ng2 Rf3 73.Re2 c3 74.Kc1 Nd3+ 75.Kc2 Nb4+ 76.Kb3 Nc6 77.Kc4

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                            • #15
                              Re: Games from Recent Events

                              Games from Recent Events

                              Missed Mates

                              This is a supplement to the game Vidit-Hovhannisyan, an earlier posting in this thread.

                              At the time, there were questions asked about whether there were other examples of such a missed mate in top-level chess. Computer-Kramnik was one guess.

                              Well, Colin McGourty in chess24.com has written an excellent article on such games:

                              https://chess24.com/en/read/news/5-i...e-missed-mates

                              The subject is not missing a one-move mate against your opponent, rather, missing that he was going to mate you on his next move!

                              Colin gives also Deep Fritz-Kramnik, Anand-Ivanchuk, Short-Chiburdanidze and Tchigorin-Steinitz. I give the games below almost without comment. After all, the reader knows what to look for!

                              A viewer said that Beliavsky–Johannessen should also have been cited and I give that as well.

                              Lake Sevan 2015
                              Round Six, July 17, 2015
                              Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi – Hovhannisyan, Robert
                              D43 QGD, Semi-Slav

                              1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 dxc4 7.e4 g5 8.Bg3 b5 9.Be2 b4 10.Na4 Nxe4 11.Be5 Nf6 12.Rc1 Bg7 13.Nc5 Nbd7 14.Nxd7 Qxd7 15.h4 g4 16.Nd2 Ba6 17.Bxg4 c3 18.bxc3 bxc3 19.Nb3 Qd5 20.Bf3 Qc4 21.Rh3 Qf1# 0-1

                              Kramnik vs Deep Fritz Match
                              Bonn, Germany
                              Round 2, Nov. 27, 2006
                              Deep Fritz – Kramnik, Vladimir
                              D20 QGA, 3.e4

                              1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e4 b5 4.a4 c6 5.Nc3 b4 6.Na2 Nf6 7.e5 Nd5 8.Bxc4 e6 9.Nf3 a5 10.Bg5 Qb6 11.Nc1 Ba6 12.Qe2 h6 13.Be3 Bxc4 14.Qxc4 Nd7 15.Nb3 Be7 16.Rc1 O-O 17.O-O Rfc8 18.Qe2 c5 19.Nfd2 Qc6 20.Qh5 Qxa4 21.Nxc5 Nxc5 22.dxc5 Nxe3 23.fxe3 Bxc5 24.Qxf7+ Kh8 25.Qf3 Rf8 26.Qe4 Qd7 27.Nb3 Bb6 28.Rfd1 Qf7 29.Rf1 Qa7 30.Rxf8+ Rxf8 31.Nd4 a4 32.Nxe6 Bxe3+ 33.Kh1 Bxc1 34.Nxf8 Qe3 35.Qh7# 1-0

                              London Grand Prix
                              Final Blitz Playoff
                              London, Round 5/2, 1994
                              Anand, Viswanathan – Ivanchuk, Vassily
                              B17 Caro-Kann, Petrosian-Smyslov Variation

                              1.e4 c6 2.Nc3 d5 3.d4 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Bc4 Ngf6 6.Ng5 e6 7.Qe2 Nb6 8.Bb3 h6 9.N5f3 c5 10.Bf4 Nbd5 11.Be5 Qa5+ 12.Nd2 b5 13.dxc5 Bxc5 14.Nf3 O-O 15.O-O-O Bb7 16.g4 Nd7 17.g5 Nxe5 18.Nxe5 Nc3 19.Qg4 Nxa2+ 20.Bxa2 h5 21.Qxh5 Qxa2 22.Nb3 Bxf2 23.Rd3 Rac8 24.Rh3 Rxc2+ 25.Kxc2 Rc8+ 26.Kd1 Qb1+ 27.Ke2 Qe4+ 28.Kxf2 Rc2+ 29.Kf1 Qf4+ 30.Nf3 Kf8 31.g6 Qc4+ 32.Kg1 Qxb3 33.Qe5 Rc1+ 34.Kf2 Qc2+ 35.Ke3 Qb3+ 36.Ke2 Qc4+ 37.Kf2 Qc2+ 38.Ke3 Qb3+ 39.Kf4 Rc4+ 40.Nd4 Qxh3 41.Qb8+ Rc8 42.Qd6+ Kg8 1-0

                              Ivanchuk missed 29..Qxh1 mate

                              Banja Luka, 1985
                              Short, Nigel – Chiburdanidze, Maia
                              B70 Sicilian, Dragon Variation

                              1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.O-O O-O 8.Kh1 Nc6 9.Nb3 a6 10.f4 b5 11.Bf3 Bd7 12.Be3 b4 13.Na4 Rb8 14.a3 a5 15.Rf2 Qc7 16.Rd2 Nd8 17.axb4 Rxb4 18.Nc3 a4 19.e5 dxe5 20.fxe5 Qxe5 21.Bd4 Qb8 22.Nc5 Bb5 23.Nxb5 Qxb5 24.Be2 Qc6 25.c3 Rb8 26.Rxa4 Qc8 27.Be5 Bh6 28.Bxb8 Bxd2 29.Qxd2 Qxb8 30.Bf3 Qb5 31.b4 Qf1# 0-1

                              It is a matter of some amusement among Nigel’s peers how badly he fares against Georgian women players.

                              World Championship Match
                              Havana, Round 23, Feb. 28, 1892
                              Chigorin, Mikhail – Steinitz, Wilhelm
                              C34 King's Gambit Accepted, Schallop Defence

                              1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e5 Nh5 5.Be2 g6 6.d4 Bg7 7.O-O d6 8.Nc3 O-O 9.Ne1 dxe5 10.Bxh5 gxh5 11.dxe5 Qxd1 12.Nxd1 Nc6 13.Bxf4 Bf5 14.Ne3 Be4 15.Nf3 Rfe8 16.Ng5 Bg6 17.Nd5 Bxe5 18.Nxc7 Bxc7 19.Bxc7 Rac8 20.Bg3 Nd4 21.c3 Ne2+ 22.Kf2 h4 23.Bd6 Nd4 24.cxd4 Rc2+ 25.Kg1 Ree2 26.Rae1 Rxg2+ 27.Kh1 Kg7 28.Re8 f5 29.Ne6+ Kf6 30.Re7 Rge2 31.d5 Rcd2 32.Bb4 Rxh2+ 0-1

                              9th Linares
                              Linares, Spain
                              Round 2, March 1, 2002
                              Beliavsky, Alexander – Johannessen, Leif Erlend
                              D58 QGD, Tartakower System

                              1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 O-O 7.e3 b6 8.Be2 Bb7 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.cxd5 exd5 11.b4 c6 12.O-O a5 13.bxa5 Rxa5 14.a4 Bc8 15.Qc2 Be6 16.Rfc1 Nd7 17.Bf1 Qa8 18.Qd1 Rc8 19.g3 g6 20.Bg2 Bg7 21.Ne2 Qb8 22.Nf4 Qd6 23.Nd2 Rca8 24.Nb3 R5a7 25.Ra2 Nf8 26.Qc2 Bd7 27.a5 bxa5 28.Rca1 Qb4 29.Nd3 Qb6 30.Qc3 Ne6 31.h4 Bc8 32.Rxa5 Rxa5 33.Rxa5 Rxa5 34.Nxa5 Ba6 35.Qb4 Bb5 36.Nb3 Qa6 37.Ndc5 Nxc5 38.Nxc5 Qa1+ 39.Kh2 Qa2 40.Qe1 h5 41.Bf1 Bf8 42.Nd3 Bd6 43.Kg2 Qc2 44.Qe2 Qb1 45.Qd2 Kg7 46.Be2 Bc4 47.Nf4 Bxf4 48.gxf4 Bb5 49.Qd1 Qf5 50.Bf3 Bd3 51.Kg3 Bc4 52.Kh2 Qf6 53.Kg3 Qf5 54.Qc1 Qd3 55.Kh2 Kh7 56.Qg1 Qc2 57.Bd1 Qd3 58.Bf3 Qc2 59.Kg3 Be2 60.Bg2 Bd3 61.Qa1 Be4 62.Qa7 Kg7 63.Qe7 Bxg2 64.Kxg2 Qe2 65.Qg5 Qd3 66.f5 Qe4+ 67.Kg3 Kh7 68.f3 Qb1 69.Kf4 Qb8# 0-1

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