Geza Fuster game

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  • Geza Fuster game

    Ive been doing some research on Geza Fuster for the local Hungarian club for an upcoming tournamenr and I dug up his game against Alekhine. I would like to challenge the readers to find a large advantage or winning variation for Geza. Give the move number and move and a variation if possible. https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1013454

  • #2
    Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
    Ive been doing some research on Geza Fuster for the local Hungarian club for an upcoming tournamenr and I dug up his game against Alekhine. I would like to challenge the readers to find a large advantage or winning variation for Geza. Give the move number and move and a variation if possible. https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1013454
    I remember I played over that game close to 40 years ago, when Geza gave the tournament book to Ilias Kourkounakis. I did not see he could have had a big advantage till looking at it with an engine about a year ago. One can only assume he was in time pressure. Sadly, he also had a winning position against Fischer, but Fischer tricked him in an ending.

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    • #3
      Geza Fuster game

      February 1, 2020

      Back in 2012 there was a thread entitled Inside Chess Collection Available on DVD:

      https://forum.chesstalk.com/forum/ch...ailable-on-dvd

      Several of us bought the DVD set. Just looking into it, I find that in the May 18,1988 issue (Vol. 1_10) on page 30 there is a full page spread: Inside Profile: IM Geza Fuster by Paul Eggers. In the next issue, this position is given:

      

      With the notation Geza Fuster – Leopold Watzl (Hungary-Austria 1947)

      1.g6 Rg1 2.Kf5! Kd3 3.e4 Ke3 4.e5 Kf3 5.e6 Rg4 6.e7 Rxf4+ 7.Kg5 Rg4+ 8.Kh5 Re4 9.g7 1-0

      and also the complete game of Geza Fuster – Andre Reichman, Saint John 1988.

      Saint John, 1988
      Fuster, Geza – Reichman, Andre
      E81 King’s Indian, Kramer System Samisch

      1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 e5 6.Nge2 O-O 7.Bg5 c6 8.Qd2 a6 9.d5 cxd5 10.Nxd5 Nc6 11.Nec3 Be6 12.Bd3 Nd4 13.O-O Bxd5 14.cxd5 b5 15.Rfc1 Qb6 16.Be3 Rfc8 17.Ne2 Nd7 18.Rxc8+ Rxc8 19.Rc1 Rxc1+ 20.Qxc1 Nc5 21.b4 $1 Nd7 22.Qc8+ Nf8 23.Bxd4 exd4 24.Qc6 Qd8 25.Qxa6 Qg5 26.f4 Qh4 27.g3 Qg4 28.Kg2 f5 29.Qc8 h5 30.h3 fxe4 31.hxg4 exd3 32.Nxd4 Bxd4 33.Kf3 hxg4+ 34.Ke4 d2 35.Qc2 Bc3 36.a3 1-0

      I have been unable to find this online. Perhaps someone can fill in the date and round of the game.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
        Ive been doing some research on Geza Fuster for the local Hungarian club for an upcoming tournamenr and I dug up his game against Alekhine. I would like to challenge the readers to find a large advantage or winning variation for Geza. Give the move number and move and a variation if possible. https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1013454
        21...g5 was !! -- I imagine Alekhine going pale when it appeared.

        22... f4 looks crushing; no variations needed, with ...Qxe5, ...Rxg5 and ...f3 if White isn't careful.

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        • #5
          The endgame vs Watzl is on page 18 of Nunn's Chess Endings, Volume 2.
          Nunn writes that 1...Rg1? is a mistake and that if 1...Re1! (or 1...Rf1!) 2.f5 and only now 2...Rg1! and Black can draw by sending the K to e3 and tossing in a timely Rg5+ before taking the g-pawn when White plays f6.
          Last edited by Tom O'Donnell; Sunday, 2nd February, 2020, 04:17 PM.
          "Knowledge illuminates visible possibilities" - http://wisdomofchopra.com/

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          • #6
            Thanks John. Great find! I just assumed 22...Qxe5 23.gxf5 gxf5 and with b2 hanging Black will get in f4 and the position is large but 22...f4 is so much better or - just a minute is 23.Rd6 a good try for White?

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            • #7
              Ian, as you were saying .... "I am always in time trouble. But you cant change the man. A long time ago Maroczy told me I could be one of the best players in the world if not for time trouble. Yuri Averbakh said Im always looking for the best move. Thats not good. I should just find a good move and play it - but I cant." IM Geza Fuster - from Inside Chess 1988 #10.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
                just a minute is 23.Rd6 a good try for White?
                Maybe a good try, but what does White do after 22..f4 23.Rd6 f3

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                • #9
                  Yes, loses at least the exchange. 24.Bf1 f2! 25.Qxf2 e3+ 26.Rxc6 Qxc6+ etc Thanks John.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wayne Komer View Post
                    Geza Fuster game

                    February 1, 2020

                    Back in 2012 there was a thread entitled Inside Chess Collection Available on DVD:

                    https://forum.chesstalk.com/forum/ch...ailable-on-dvd

                    Several of us bought the DVD set. Just looking into it, I find that in the May 18,1988 issue (Vol. 1_10) on page 30 there is a full page spread: Inside Profile: IM Geza Fuster by Paul Eggers. In the next issue, this position is given:

                    

                    With the notation Geza Fuster – Leopold Watzl (Hungary-Austria 1947)

                    1.g6 Rg1 2.Kf5! Kd3 3.e4 Ke3 4.e5 Kf3 5.e6 Rg4 6.e7 Rxf4+ 7.Kg5 Rg4+ 8.Kh5 Re4 9.g7 1-0

                    and also the complete game of Geza Fuster – Andre Reichman, Saint John 1988.

                    Saint John, 1988
                    Fuster, Geza – Reichman, Andre
                    E81 King’s Indian, Kramer System Samisch

                    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 e5 6.Nge2 O-O 7.Bg5 c6 8.Qd2 a6 9.d5 cxd5 10.Nxd5 Nc6 11.Nec3 Be6 12.Bd3 Nd4 13.O-O Bxd5 14.cxd5 b5 15.Rfc1 Qb6 16.Be3 Rfc8 17.Ne2 Nd7 18.Rxc8+ Rxc8 19.Rc1 Rxc1+ 20.Qxc1 Nc5 21.b4 $1 Nd7 22.Qc8+ Nf8 23.Bxd4 exd4 24.Qc6 Qd8 25.Qxa6 Qg5 26.f4 Qh4 27.g3 Qg4 28.Kg2 f5 29.Qc8 h5 30.h3 fxe4 31.hxg4 exd3 32.Nxd4 Bxd4 33.Kf3 hxg4+ 34.Ke4 d2 35.Qc2 Bc3 36.a3 1-0

                    I have been unable to find this online. Perhaps someone can fill in the date and round of the game.
                    In the Fuster Reichman game 21.b4! is an amazing tickler and 24.Qc6 a wonderful follow up.

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