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  • Larry Castle
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne Komer View Post
    Great Chess Quotes

    July 24, 2020

    Memorizing Word Lists

    Being able to memorize a list of words and then repeat them back in the right order and after a period of time is much in the news lately. Donald Trump in an interview said that he was able to do that difficult task quite easily on a cognitive assessment test recently.

    Edward Winter has an article on the Memory Feats of Chess Masters

    https://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/memory.html

    This about Harry Nelson Pillsbury in 1896:

    (After a simultaneous exhibition at the Northampton Club in Pennsylvania) he offered to memorize thirty words, no matter how hard they might be, the selections to be read to him only once. Professor Merriman of Lehigh University and Dr. Trelkeld-Edwards of Bethlehem picked out most of the following words: Antiphlogistian, pereosteum, takadiastase, plasmin, ambrosia, Threikeld, streptococcus, staphylococcus, micrococcus, plasmodium, Mississippi, Freiheit, Philadelphia, Cincinnati athletics, no war, Eichenberg, American, Russia, philosophy, Piet-Potgleter’s-Rost, Salamagundi, Oomisillecootsi, Bangmamvato, Schlechter’s Nek, Manziuyama, theosophy, catechism and Madjesoomalopa.

    Pillsbury memorized these words and repeated them in the order given and in the reverse order, and he did not have any difficulty in repeating them the next day.

    (For the spelling of the words, their meaning and their number, please see):

    https://userpages.monmouth.com/~colo...pillsbury.html
    _________

    From the Fox News interview of July 19, 2020, President Donald Trump with Chris Wallace:

    “The first questions are very easy,” Trump told Fox News. “The last questions are much more difficult. Like a memory question. It’s, like, you’ll go: Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV. So they say, ‘Could you repeat that?’ So I said, ‘Yeah. It’s: Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV.’”

    He then recalled that, at the end of the test, the doctor asked him to recite it again.

    “And you go: ‘Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV.’ If you get it in order, you get extra points,” Trump said. “They said nobody gets it in order. It’s actually not that easy, but for me, it was easy.”

    Trump boasted that he dazzled the doctors because he has “a good memory, because8217;Im cognitively there”.
    When later Trump was asked to repeat the first sentence of the last book he had read, he astounded the doctors with his genius by replying, "See Spot run".

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    July 24, 2020

    Memorizing Word Lists

    Being able to memorize a list of words and then repeat them back in the right order and after a period of time is much in the news lately. Donald Trump in an interview said that he was able to do that difficult task quite easily on a cognitive assessment test recently.

    Edward Winter has an article on the Memory Feats of Chess Masters

    https://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/memory.html

    This about Harry Nelson Pillsbury in 1896:

    (After a simultaneous exhibition at the Northampton Club in Pennsylvania) he offered to memorize thirty words, no matter how hard they might be, the selections to be read to him only once. Professor Merriman of Lehigh University and Dr. Trelkeld-Edwards of Bethlehem picked out most of the following words: Antiphlogistian, pereosteum, takadiastase, plasmin, ambrosia, Threikeld, streptococcus, staphylococcus, micrococcus, plasmodium, Mississippi, Freiheit, Philadelphia, Cincinnati athletics, no war, Eichenberg, American, Russia, philosophy, Piet-Potgleter’s-Rost, Salamagundi, Oomisillecootsi, Bangmamvato, Schlechter’s Nek, Manziuyama, theosophy, catechism and Madjesoomalopa.

    Pillsbury memorized these words and repeated them in the order given and in the reverse order, and he did not have any difficulty in repeating them the next day.

    (For the spelling of the words, their meaning and their number, please see):

    https://userpages.monmouth.com/~colo...pillsbury.html
    _________

    From the Fox News interview of July 19, 2020, President Donald Trump with Chris Wallace:

    “The first questions are very easy,” Trump told Fox News. “The last questions are much more difficult. Like a memory question. It’s, like, you’ll go: Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV. So they say, ‘Could you repeat that?’ So I said, ‘Yeah. It’s: Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV.’”

    He then recalled that, at the end of the test, the doctor asked him to recite it again.

    “And you go: ‘Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV.’ If you get it in order, you get extra points,” Trump said. “They said nobody gets it in order. It’s actually not that easy, but for me, it was easy.”

    Trump boasted that he dazzled the doctors because he has “a good memory, because I’m cognitively there”.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    July 19, 2020


    First Chess Books

    Do you remember the first few chess books you read?

    This from Jonathan Speelman (born 1956) and appearing in ChessBase:

    https://en.chessbase.com/post/speelman-agony-126

    When I was little, I had a row of chess books on a shelf above my bed. Of course I can’t remember all of them, but several are very clear.

    After learning the moves of chess from my cousin on Boxing Day (December 26th) 1962, my first chess book was Chess for Children by Bott and Morrison, which gave me the basics.

    My first-ever serious chess book though was Bob Wade’s account of the 1963 World Championship match between Mikhail Botvinnik and Tigran Petrosian. My mum bought it for me in Edgware Road presumably — the match ran from March to May — in the summer of 1963. With a distinctive dark red cover once it lost its jacket (I can see it on a shelf now) I’ve enjoyed re-reading and dipping into it ever since. Some of the games — especially Petrosian's epic king march in game 5 — are truly memorable.

    Later, I got Euwe and Kramer’s two-volume work on the middlegame, Bent Larsen’s Selected Games 1948-69 and Peter Clarke’s book on Mikhail Tal (which annoyingly, although I can see at least five other books on Tal, I can’t at the moment bring to hand).

    And a couple of years later, I beat some 200ish ECF (2200ish) player in a simultaneous display at Foyles (the famous book shop on Tottenham Court Road) and won a whole selection of books from Pergamon Press, including Vladimir Vukovic’s wonderful The Art of Attack in Chess and a book on Petrosian by Alberic O’Kelly de Galway — the Belgian count who as an arbiter at some team competition in the 1970s once attempted to get the England team captain David Anderton to “order” myself and Jonathan Mestel to get our hair cut!

    The Pergamon Tranche also included A Complete Defence to 1.P-K4, a study of the then backwater, the Petroff, by Bernard Caffery and David Hooper. Though our main opening bible in the English speaking world at that time was Modern Chess Openings.

    I had the tenth edition (1965, completely revised by Larry Evans under the editorship of Walter Korn). Chess theory was then still very rudimentary compared to today, and there was a wonderfully whooly quote about the Yugoslav Attack against the Dragon which went, “Black must react promptly and vigorously — just how is not quite clear”. I also found the 8th, 11th and 13th editions on my shelves. By the 11th (Walter Korn, 1972), defences had been found against the Yugoslav.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    July 3, 2020

    Cheating Online

    I am against profanity used online, so, this censored quote from Andrey Deviatkin:

    If you use this S*** - https://chess-bot.com/ - during your chess games, you should avoid any interactions with me. Just p*** off.

    https://twitter.com/AndreyDeviatkin?...ess-news.ru%2F

    and what does chess-bot offer?

    ChessBotX: Real-time next chess move calculator

    Chess bot is the program for chess, which helps you to play on websites like chess.com, lichess.org, flyordie.com and many others. ChessBotX can play in automatic mode by itself or just show you best moves on the chessboard directly in your game.

    You can use chess bot for game analysis, chess learning or just for fun!

    Chess calculator requires a chess engine to run. There are a lot of different engines such as Stockfish, Houdini, Rybka, Komodo and others. By default chess bot is provided with Stockfish – a strong open source chess engine.

    Q: Can I get banned for using this software?

    A: Yes, if you're using it for cheating, you will be banned sooner or later. You're using it at your own risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    June 29, 2020

    Oh, to be able to read Dutch! (continued)

    Anekdotengids voor Schaakliefhebbers


    By Rob Spaans

    The third paragraph of the introduction in Dutch reads:

    Behalve anekdotes over Browne en Andersson kunt u ook heel veel andere anekdotes lezen in deze Anekdotengids voor Schaakliefhebbers, zoals over de minnares van Capablanca, over de katers van Aljechin, over het pistool van Euwe, over Fischer die geen Fischer had moeten heten, over de yoghurt van Karpov, over een schaakbordmoordenaar en over een schaakstuk dat voor bijna een miljoen euro werd verhandeld.

    I translated “over de katers van Aljechin” as “about the cats of Alekhine” but had an inkling of the double meaning of “katers”. I wrote to Rob Spaans mentioning this and his reply:

    Concerning "the katers van Aljechin": this is a rather playful description because in Dutch 'katers' can mean male cats but also hangovers. Both were connected with Alekhine of course.
    ___________

    Rob has books, in Dutch, of chess anecdotes and of chess geography. I intend to add both to my collection.

    Anekdotengids voor Schaakhefhebbers (2020)

    and

    Reisgids voor Schaakliefhebbers (2018)

    A description of Reisgids

    Travel guide for chess lovers

    Rob Spaans has put together a Travel Guide for Chess Enthusiasts and invites you to take a journey through our chess cultural heritage.

    In his guide he has described more than a hundred places with many photos where chess and cultural history come together and where possible with a background story. It was a project of many years where many assisted him with advice and action. His book has more than 300 pages.

    One wants to make a distant European trip and the other a short trip in his own country. The guide provides both and takes you through chess villages, churches, museums, cemeteries, castles, restaurants, open-air places and much more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    June 26, 2020

    Oh, to be able to read Dutch!

    On the New in Chess website, there is a book on chess anecdotes advertised. In English the title is ‘Anecdote Guide for Chess Enthusiasts’:


    Anekdotengids voor Schaakliefhebbers
    By Rob Spaans

    An illustration of the cover shows identically dressed twin ladies in sunglasses watching Browne play Andersson.

    From the introduction:

    Greetings chess lover,

    The two ladies in the audience in this fascinating photo are a striking appearance. You see, the twins, because they have the same haircut, the same glasses and the same clothes. They have installed themselves to be able to follow the games of the chess tournament for a long time. The puzzle books are ready for when the chess players are busy for a long time hatching a move.

    Unfortunately, your guide was unable to find the answer to the obvious question of who the twin ladies are and where their interest in chess comes from, and you cannot read that in this book. What you can read in it are anecdotes about the chess players in the foreground who are engaged in a fierce battle on the 64 fields. You may have recognized them. It is the American Walter Browne with the white pieces and the Swede Ulf Andersson with the black pieces. It looks like they are not distracted by the remarkable duo in the audience and are completely absorbed in their duel.

    In addition to anecdotes about Browne and Andersson, you can also read a lot of other anecdotes in this Anecdotes guide for chess enthusiasts, such as about the mistress of Capablanca, about the cats of Aljechin, about the gun of Euwe, about Fischer who should not have been called Fischer, about the yogurt from Karpov, about a chessboard killer and about a chess piece that was traded for almost a million euros.

    https://www.newinchess.com/anekdoten...aakliefhebbers
    ____________-

    Browne and Andersson played twenty games against each other. The only two in the Netherlands where Browne had the white pieces were:

    Browne – Andersson, Hoogovens 1976 0.5-0.5
    Browne – Andersson, Amsterdam IBM 1978 0-1

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    June 23, 2020

    What’s In A Name?


    A few days ago, I was wondering if Firouzja, Maghsoodloo and Ivanchuk were playing chess somewhere and found they were all in an online tournament, Chartres Blitz Men Master 2020, so I posted games:

    https://forum.chesstalk.com/forum/ch...en-master-2020

    The title is more properly C’Chartres….

    Well, it must have been the oddity of the name, because never has a posting on ChessTalk had so few views initially.

    If Carlsen or Fischer had been in the title, it would have taken off like a rocket.

    I couldn’t think of a heading that would get a worse reception. But a day later on the English Chess Forum I saw one that might be worse:

    7th International Clergy Polish Correspondence Chess Championship

    See:

    https://www.ecforum.org.uk/viewtopic...212ae5#p247334

    Later: Oh dear! As of today, there have been 480 views and 7 replies to that. So, C'Chartres Blitz Men Master 2020 with just 40 views holds the record.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    June 17, 2020

    The Invention of the Swiss System

    By Andre Schulz

    https://en.chessbase.com/post/125-years-swiss-system

    The inventor of the Swiss System was Dr. Julius Müller, a teacher by profession. The official birth date of the still popular and successful system is June 15, 1895, its birthplace is Zurich.

    The Swiss system is a format for sporting events, which is used in tournaments with a large number of participants. In contrast to the knockout system, defeated players are not eliminated but stay in the tournament.

    In Swiss tournaments players with the same number of points are paired against each other. Thus, in the course of the tournament the successful players play against each other – though no more than once – to fight for tournament victory.

    Players should be paired against players with the same number of points but the colour with which they play should also alternate. That is, a player who had White in the first round should have Black in the second round and White again in round three. However, these two principles often clash and that is the reason why almost all tournaments are played with an odd numbers of rounds. Of course, now some players will have one more game with White, while others have one more game with Black. But this is easier to tolerate than having two more games with Black which can easily happen in tournaments with an even number of rounds. Nevertheless, there are traditional tournaments with an even number of rounds, e.g. the Open in Gibraltar.

    But who invented or first tried this popular pairing system? As you probably guessed and as the name indicates, the Swiss invented it. Or, to be more precise, one Swiss did – Dr. Julius Müller, and therefore the system could also be called Müller-System. Most sources give June 15, 1895, as the birthday of the Swiss system, which is almost exactly 125 years ago.

    At the end of the 19th century chess became more and more popular and more and more players wanted to take part in tournaments. The Swiss system was used to give all players the opportunity to play in tournaments and to give these tournaments a fixed schedule. The Swiss system is so clever and has been so successful that it is still used today and has become the standard for all amateur tournaments with many participants.

    Dr. Julius Müller (1857-1917) was a teacher in Brugg, a community that is about 20 km away from Zurich. However, in their history of the Schachgesellschaft Zürich, which was founded in 1809 and is the world's oldest still existing chess club, Richard Forster and Christian Rohrer claim that Julius Müller already used his new pairing system – at least in a "beta version" – at the 1. Schweizerische Schachturnier, the First Swiss Chess Tournament, that was played on June 1 and 2, 1889. This seems quite plausible as 74 players took part in that tournament. But apparently Julius Müller improved his system over the years and today the 5. Schweizerische Schachturnier, the Fifth Swiss Tournament, is considered to be the birthplace of the Swiss system.

    Incidentally, the Fifth Swiss Tournament was won by Max Pestalozzi, the organiser of the event and a distant relative of the well-known pedagogue Heinrich Pestalozzi. Place two went to Artur Poplawski from Poland.

    125 years later the Swiss System, which was invented by chess players, is still extremely popular and is regularly used in other sports, often in slightly modified form.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    June 12, 2020

    Occupations of Chess Players (continued)

    Louis-Charles Mahe de La Bourdonnais (1795-1840) was a land speculator (and not a very good one at that).

    Richard Teichmann (1868-1925) was a language teacher.
    Lajos Asztalos (1889-1956) was a languages teacher.

    Lawyers and chess masters include Gerald Abrahams, Alexander Alekhine, Rosendo Balinas (1941-1998), Curt von Bardeleben, Ossip Bernstein, Miroslav Filip, Johann Hjartarson, Paul Lipke, Paul Morphy (never practiced), Bill Martz (never practiced and became a car salesman instead), Meindert Niemeijer, Fredrik Olafsson, Julius Perlis, Harold Phillips, Domenico Ponziani, Folke Rogard, Alexander Rueb, James Sherwin (Executive VP of GAF Corporation and director at Hunter Douglas), Saviely Tartakower, Karel Treybal (judge), Mijo Udovcic, Michale Wilder (partner at McDermott Will & Emery), and Daniel Yanofsky (mayor of a suburb of Winnipeg).

    James Tarjan (1952- ) gave up chess to become a librarian.

    Paul Keres (1916-1975) was once a professor of mathematics in Tallinn, Estonia.

    Mathematicians and chess players include C.H.O’D Alexander, Adolf Anderssen, Magdy Assem, George Atwood, Christoph Bandelow, John Beasley, Otto Blathy, Hans Boumeester, Nathan Divinsky, Noam Elkies, Arpad Elo, Max Euwe, Ed Formanek, William Hartston, Paul Keres, Martin Kreuzer, Emanuel Lasker, Anatoly Lein, Lev Loshinksi, Vladimir Makogonov, Geza Maroczy, Vania Mascioni, J. Mauldon, Jonathan Mestel, Walter Morris, John Nunn, Nick Patterson, Miodrag Petkovic, Ken Regan, Hans-Peter Rehm, Ken Rogoff, and Duncan Suttles.

    Mechanical engineers and chess masters include Alexander Kotov and Edward Lasker.

    Medical doctors and chess masters include Jana Bellin, Fedor Bogatirchuk (also professor of radiological anatomy), Karl Burger, Ricardo Calvo, Yona Kosashvili, Ariel Mengarini (psychiatrist), Joseph Platz, Helmut Pfleger, Christine Rosenfeld, Anthony Saidy (specializing in tuberculosis), Siegbert Tarrasch, and Johannes Zukertort.

    Milan Vukcevich (1937-2003) was a professor of metallurgy and Chief Engineer at General Electric. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    Lev Aronin (1920-1983) was a Soviet IM and a meteorologist.

    Some served in the military. C.H. O’D Alexander was a British Colonel and code breaker. Tartakower was a Lieutenant in the French Underground during World War II. Johann Allgaier was a quartermaster in the Austrian army. Jose Araiza was the Mexican Champion from 1924 to 1949 and was a Lt. Colonel in the Mexican army. Paul Rudolf von Bilguer was an Army Lieutenant. John Cochrane was a lieutenant in the British navy. Alexander Deschapelles lost his right arm fighting the Prussians. Oldrich Duras served in the Austrio-Hungarian army during World War I. Svetozar Gligoric was considered one of Yugoslavia’s best war heroes during World War II. Klaus Junge was a German Lieutenant and was shot and killed during World War II. Grigory Koshnitsky was an anti-tank gunner during World War II. George Mackenzie served as Captain in the Northern Army in the American Civil War. Gavriil Veresov was a Captain in the Russian Army. Eugene Znosko-Borovsky was wounded in the Russo-Japanese war and World War I.

    Musicians and chess masters include Armand Blackmar (music professor and music publisher), Hans Johner (director of the Zurich Philharmonic Orchestra), Philidor, Mark Taimanov (concert pianist), Eileen Tranmer, and Eugene Znosko-Borovsky (music critic).

    Jean Dufresne (1829-1893) was a newspaper editor in Berlin.

    Painters include Samuel Boden, Marcel Duchamp, Henry Grob, Bernhard Horwitz.

    Irving Chernev (1900-1981) was employed in the paper industry.

    Robert Huebner (1948- ) worked as a papyrologist (an expert on Egyptian hieroglyphics)

    Miguel Najdorf (1910-1997) was a porcelain importer.
    Josef Klinger (1946- ) gave up chess to become a professional poker player. Ken Smith (1930-1999) was a professional poker player. Walter Browne (1949- ) is a professional poker player and has won over $300,000 in poker (see picture).

    Reuben Fine (1914-1993), during World War II, was a translator. He gave up chess to become a psychoanalyst.
    Nikolai Krogius (1930- ) was a sports psychologist. He is a Russian GM.

    Henry Atkins (1872-1955), who won the British championship 9 times, was a British schoolmaster. He was a math teacher, and was then appointed principal at Huddersfield College.

    Howard Staunton (1810-1874) was a Shakespeare scholar.

    Seamen included Arthur Dake and William Evans (ship captain).

    For a time, Grandmaster Simen Agdestein (1967- ) was also a professional soccer player. He now teaches soccer and chess at a sports gymnasium in Norway. He won seven Norwegian chess championships.

    GM Duncan Suttles of Canada is a software developer and president of Magnetar Games.

    IM Mario Bertok (1929-2008) of Croatia was a sports journalist.

    Emil Schallopp (1843-1919) was a stenographer. He was a German player and author.

    Ilya Gurevich (1972- ) became a stock exchange options trader. Ron Henley (1956- ) became a member of the American stock exchange. Larry Kaufman (1947- ) became a successful stock broker and trader. GM David Norwood became a trader at Bankers Trust, but quit after a few months. He then found a job at Duncan Lawrie, a British private bank. In 2008, at the age of 40, he retired as a multi-millionaire.

    John Roycroft (1929- ) was a systems engineer for IBM for 26 years.

    Taxi drivers include Victor Frias, Nicolas Rossolimo, and Tim Taylor.

    International Master Frank Anderson (1928-1980) graduated with a physics and mathematics degree from the University of Toronto and ran a tax consulting business.

    Teachers and chess masters include Adolf Anderssen (math), Gedeon Barcza (math), Ludwig Bledow (math), Donald Byrne (English), Robert Byrne (philosophy), Arpad Elo (physics and astronomy), Max Euwe (math), Paul Keres (math), Lionel Kieseritzky (math), Danny Kopec (computer science), Geza Maroczy (math), Stuart Rachels (philosophy), Ken Regan (computer science), Ken Rogoff (economics), and Anthony Santasiere.

    Vladimir Antoshin (1929-1994) was a technical designer and may have worked for the KGB.

    Vlastimil Hort (1944- ) worked for a general-interest magazine as a translator.

    Walter Korn (1908-1997) directed the U.N. Relief and Rehabilitation Administration after World War II, helping relocate concentration camp survivors.

    Sir Philip Milner-Barry became Under-Secretary of the Treasury in England.

    Geza Maroczy (1870-1951) was a waterworks engineer.

    Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964) was a prolific writer. He wrote over 100 books.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    June 12, 2020

    From:

    https://emmanuelbasi.blogspot.com/20...2e124ec1e4542b


    Occupations of Chess Players

    By Emmanuel Basi

    Here are some occupations of some chess masters and well-known chess players.

    Accountants and chess masters include Johann Allgaier (1763-1823), Henry Bird (1830-1908), Samuel Reshevsky (1911-1992), and Frederick Yates (1834-1932). Bird also wrote a book entitled An Analysis of Railways in the United Kingdom. Reshevsky graduated from the University of Chicago in 1934 with a degree in accounting and was an accountant for a Manhattan engineering and construction firm.

    Chess players who knew how to fly airplanes include Ed Edmundson (1920-1982), Max Euwe (1901-1981), Harry Golombek (1911-1995), Carol Jarecki (1935- ), and Woman GM Natalia Pogonina (1985- ). Edmondson was an air Force Lieutenant Colonel and a navigator on tanker aircraft.

    Pascal Charbonneau won the Canadian championship twice. He is an analyst at Alpine Associates working on Wall Street.

    Samuel Boden (1826-1882) was an art critic and amateur landscape painter. He was also the chess editor of the Field from 1858 until 1873. He started as a railway clerk.

    Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) was a renowned artist and one of the founders of Dadaism, surrealism, and cubism.

    Dr. Nathan Divinksy (1925- 2012) served as assistant dean of science at the University of British Columbia. His wife was the 19th Prime Minister of Canada, Kim Campbell. Divinksy received a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Chicago and became a mathematics teacher. He is now an alderman on the Vancouver, BC city council.

    Gosta Stoltz (1904-1963) was an automobile mechanic as well as Swedish chess grandmaster.

    Sir George Thomas (1881-1972) was a professional badminton and tennis player (he once played at Wimbledon). He won the British chess championship twice and the All-England Badminton championship 7 times. In 1911, he played in the semi-finals of the men’s tennis double at Wimbledon.

    Max Harmonist (1864-1907) was a ballet dancer for the Royal Ballet in Berlin, performing at the Imperial Opera House.

    Bankers and chess masters include Bill Addison (1933-2008), Ossip Bernstein (1882-1962), Ignatz Kolisch (1837-1889), Ken Rogoff (1953- ), and Max Weiss (1857-1927). Addison gave up chess (he was an International Master) to work at the Bank of America in San Francisco. Addison was also considered one of the best Go players in the U.S.

    Bernstein was a financial lawyer and earned a doctorate in Law at Heidelberg in 1906. Kolisch started out as a private secretary of the Russian Prince Urusov, then moved to Vienna and met Albert Rothschild, who got him involved in banking. Kolisch became a millionaire from banking and later became a chess patron. Rogoff served as an economist at the International Monetary Fund and was on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He is currently a Professor of Economics at Harvard University. Weiss was a banker for the Rothschild bank in Vienna. He also studied mathematics and physics in Vienna and later taught those subjects.

    Luke McShane is a GM and bond trader in London’s financial sector.

    Larry Evans (1932-2010) was considered the best blackjack player of any Grandmaster. He was also a journalist. He wrote over 50 chess books.

    Boxers include Arnold Denker (1914-2005) and Max Euwe (1901-1981). Denker was a Golden Gloves boxing quarterfinalist in New York and won three Golden Gloves bouts by knockouts in the welterweight division. He was also a promising young baseball player who later got a job at a meat-packing company. Euwe was an amateur boxer and won the amateur heavyweight boxing championship of Europe.

    Arthur Dake (1910-2000) was director of the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). He started out as a merchant seaman. He then sold insurance and telephone directories.

    Amos Burn (1848-1925) was a cotton broker and sugar broker from Liverpool. He was a chess journalist and from 1913 until his death, Burn edited the chess column of The Field.

    Viacheslav Ragozin (1908-1962) was a civil engineer and had a career in the construction industry.

    Arnold Denker (1914-2005) was a businessman in the meat packing industry and became a millionaire.

    Edmar Mednis (1937-2002) was a chemical engineer, then a stock broker.

    Weaver Adams (1901-1963) was a chicken farmer.

    British civil servants and chess masters include Oldrich Duras (1882-1957), Wilhelm Hanstein (1811-1850), Stuart Milner-Barry (1906-1995), and Edward Sergeant (1881-1961).

    Members of the clergy include Bill Lombardy (1937- ), George MacDonnell (1830-1899), Ruy Lopez (1540-1580), John Owen (1827-1901), Domenico Ponziani (1719-1796), Charles Ranken (1828-1905), Arthur Skipworth (1830-1898), and William Wayte (1829-1898).

    Lombardy is a former Roman Catholic priest. Ruy Lopez was a Spanish priest and later bishop in Segura. Owen was an English vicar. Ponziani was a law professor and priest who became a canon in the Modena Cathedral, then Vicar General. Ranken was a Church of England clergyman. He and Lord Randolph Churchill (Winston Churchill’s father) founded the Oxford University Chess Club. Wayte was a Church of England clergyman.

    In his earlier years, Arthur Bisguier (1929- ) was a computer programmer at IBM and gave that up to become a professional chess player.

    Cryptographers included C.H.O’D Alexander (1909-1974), Reuben Fine (1914-1993), Harry Golombek (1911-1995), James Aitken (1908-1983), and Stuart Milner-Barry (1906-1995).

    Vincenzo Castaldi (1916-1970) was a dentist in Florence, Italy. He was an Italian International Master.

    George Koltanowski (1903-2000) was a diamond cutter.
    Diplomats include Jose Capablanca (Cuba), Max Judd (consul-general in Vienna), James Mortimer, and Tassilo von Lasa (Prussia).

    Louis Paulsen (1833-1891) established a distillery and was a tobacco farmer.

    Elijah Williams (1809-1854) worked as a druggist.

    Economists and chess masters include Igor Bondarevsky (1913-1979), Ivan Farago, Gyozo Forintos, Aivars Gipslis, Yair Kraidman, and Ken Rogoff (chief economist at the World Bank).

    Electrical engineers and masters include Mikhail Botvinnik and Vladimir Liberzon. John Watson has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering. I have degrees in physics and electrical engineering and am a systems engineer.
    GM Eero Book (1910-1990) of Finland was an engineer.
    Former world women’s chess champion Elisaveta Bykova (1913-1989) was an engineer in a large Moscow printing house.

    Donald Byrne (1930-1976) was an associate professor of English at Penn State.

    Grigory Levenfish (1889-1961) was an engineer in the glass industry. He had a degree in chemical engineering.

    Julio Granda-Zuniga (1967- ) is a farmer in Peru. He is a Peruvian GM.

    Alexey Troitsky (1866-1942) was a forester in Siberia.

    IM Alfred Brinckmann (1891-1967) of Germany was a functionary.

    Bukhuti Gurgenidze (1933-2008) was a geologist. He was a GM from Soviet Georgia.

    Victor Palciuskas (1941- ) is a former world correspondence chess champion. He was a professor of geophysics.

    Vladimir Alatortsev (1909-1987) was a Soviet GM and hydraulics engineer.

    Insurance salesmen include Al Horowitz, Isaac Kashdan, Miguel Najdorf, and William Napier (vice-president of Scranton Life Insurance).

    Journalists and chess masters include Manuel Aaron, Lajos Asztalos, Robert Byrne (1928-2013), Emil Diemer, Isaac Kashdan, Lubomir Kavalek, George Koltanowski, Mario Monticelli, Andy Soltis, and Boris Spassky.

    (to be continued)

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  • Hans Jung
    replied
    You do not have to play well, just help your opponent play badly. - Genrikh Chepukaitis - one of my favorite characters of Russian chess

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    May 20, 2020

    Nigel Short:

    Covid-19 has taught me a few lessons. One of them is that I do not need to travel abroad every 4 weeks to stay sane.

    https://twitter.com/nigelshortchess?...Ctwgr%5Eauthor

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  • Hans Jung
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne Komer View Post
    Great Chess Quotes

    May 6, 2020

    From an FIDE article entitled Andor Lilienthal: 99 years of prowess

    https://www.fide.com/news/512

    In 1976, at the request of his mother, Andor returned to Budapest and lived there since. Almost all chess kings of the XX century visited his apartment in the Hungarian capital, but Bobby Fischer was the only one who lived there for a month. It happened when he was hiding from the US authorities after the 1992 match with Spassky in Yugoslavia. “He could eat half a pot of Olga’s borsch and loved caviar,” – recalled Andor in one of the interviews. They were friends. The flighty American genius approved only three chess players who could carry his coffin at the funeral: Andor Lilienthal, Lajos Portisch, and Boris Spassky.
    Thats something I didnt know and says alot. re carrying Fischer's coffin: Lilienthal, Portisch and Spassky.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    May 6, 2020

    From an FIDE article entitled Andor Lilienthal: 99 years of prowess

    https://www.fide.com/news/512

    In 1976, at the request of his mother, Andor returned to Budapest and lived there since. Almost all chess kings of the XX century visited his apartment in the Hungarian capital, but Bobby Fischer was the only one who lived there for a month. It happened when he was hiding from the US authorities after the 1992 match with Spassky in Yugoslavia. “He could eat half a pot of Olga’s borsch and loved caviar,” – recalled Andor in one of the interviews. They were friends. The flighty American genius approved only three chess players who could carry his coffin at the funeral: Andor Lilienthal, Lajos Portisch, and Boris Spassky.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Komer
    replied
    Great Chess Quotes

    April 9, 2020

    A Sports Story with Everything

    By Arun George@timesgroup.com

    Despite power failure, GM Narayanan powers on

    Kochi: Chess Grandmaster SL Narayanan is in a rush to arrange an inverter. He’s hoping to borrow one as it is tough to buy anything non-essential during the nationwide lockdown in the wake of the Covid-29 pandemic.

    The Kerala player almost lost a quarterfinal tie with Venezuelan GM Eduardo Iturrizaga Bonelli and missed out on a potential final pairing with world champion Magnus Carlsen in the popular Banter Blitz Cup online tournament in chess24.com, due to power failure Monday night.

    The tie was scheduled at 10pm and Narayan had logged in from his home at Thiruvananthapuram. He was cruising at 3.5-1.5 when the first setback occurred. Again, while leading 6.5-4.5, power failure played spoil-sport for a second time. The nature of the online tournament (3 minutes per player) is such that you forfeit if you lose connectivity while the game is on.

    “Both the games were crucial and losing them due to connection problems nearly ruined the entire tie. Luckily power was back and I could win the last two games,” said Narayan after the exhaustive event.

    At the end of it all, Narayan secured a 8.5-6.5 win in the 26-round tie.

    Narayanan is the only Indian remaining in the knockout competition that started last September with 128 prominent players worldwide. World’s best Carlsen and the sensational Ali Reza Firouzja are two others left in the hunt.

    Ideally, the popular Kerala GM would be t ravelling the world to play regular tournaments but with all events cancelled, he started to gibe online chess some serious thought.

    “We need to live stream the games as well and my mobile internet and some usual services are not fast enough in our locality,” said Narayanan. His father Sunilduth says they are reliant on a cable-linked connection.

    Narayanan is hoping to resolve the nagging non-chess problem when he faces Firouzja in the semifinal in a few days’ time. (April 10). The formidable blitz player had crushed German Georg Meier 8.5-2.5 to advance while Carlsen will be playing Sanan Sjugirov in the other last-four clash (Carlsen won 9 games to 0).


    https://chess24.com/en/read/news/mag...er-s-footsteps

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