Grandmaster Candidates

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
    Another name from the past is Zhe Quan. I cant find a list of norms but Im sure he made at least one.
    Sure, a very strong and talented player. But he quit chess 15 years ago, he could not be a real candidate.

    Unfortunately, right now I don't see in Canada any player I could say about him "He (or she) will be a GM next 2 years for sure". Really hope to be wrong.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Victor Plotkin View Post
      Unfortunately, right now I don't see in Canada any player I could say about him "He (or she) will be a GM next 2 years for sure". Really hope to be wrong.
      Unfortunate situation that 2020 and probably 2021 is going down the drain for perspective players.

      The list of players from 2300 and up:

      Code:
      # Name Title Fed Rating B-Year
      5 Noritsyn, Nikolay IM CAN 2512 1991
      12 Panjwani, Raja IM CAN 2448 1990
      14 Plotkin, Mark IM CAN 2430 1998
      15 Samsonkin, Artiom IM CAN 2428 1989
      16 Song, Michael IM CAN 2421 1999
      17 Thavandiran, Shiyam IM CAN 2420 1992
      18 Le, Quang Long IM CAN 2420 1989
      19 Krnan, Tomas IM CAN 2417 1988
      20 Porper, Edward IM CAN 2398 1963
      21 Kleinman, Michael IM CAN 2387 1994
      22 Yu, Zong Yang FM CAN 2387 1999
      23 Chiku-Ratte, Olivier-Kenta IM CAN 2377 1999
      24 Plotkin, Victor FM CAN 2367 1968
      25 Gerzhoy, Leonid IM CAN 2348 1987
      26 Zhao, Ian FM CAN 2347 2005
      27 Talukdar, Rohan FM CAN 2341 2003
      28 Hebert, Jean IM CAN 2339 1957
      29 Hua, Eugene FM CAN 2336 2003
      30 Wang, Richard IM CAN 2336 1998
      31 Cummings, David H. IM CAN 2335 1961
      32 Zhang, Yuanchen FM CAN 2330 2001
      33 Hartman, Brian IM CAN 2319 1957
      34 Barbeau, Sylvain FM CAN 2310 1961
      35 Doknjas, Joshua FM CAN 2305 2002
      Before 2020, my hopes were on Mark Plotkin and Michael Song.

      Comment


      • #18
        Yes what about Mark?
        and thanks for the reminder of Shiyam Thavandiran. I know he's committed to the journey so I'll add him.

        Comment


        • #19
          The late FM Todd Southam (1969-96) scored one IM norm, at the 1993 Biel Open.
          Also, the late IM Frank Anderson (1928-80) had probably the saddest political outcome when dealing with FIDE. He scored one GM norm, at Amsterdam 1954 Olympiad, but was robbed of the title due to a strange scenario at the 1958 Munich Olympiad (which has now been reformed by FIDE).

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          • #20
            I wasnt aware of Le Quang Long being in Canada. Is he related to GM Le Quang Liem?

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
              I wasnt aware of Le Quang Long being in Canada. Is he related to GM Le Quang Liem?
              Looks like that. Picture at https://vietnam.vnanet.vn/english/ch...iem/34318.html they play each other.

              He has already participated in two CFC-rated tournaments :)

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Gordon Taylor View Post
                There are two others I can think of. Roman Pelts made an IM norm at one of the Olympiads in Greece. Ray Stone made a couple I think; one at a World Open in Philadelphia where he defeated Larry Christiansen. Not sure of the other.
                I think Ray had at least three but some expired under the rules of the day.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Egidijus Zeromskis View Post

                  Unfortunate situation that 2020 and probably 2021 is going down the drain for perspective players.

                  The list of players from 2300 and up:

                  Code:
                  # Name Title Fed Rating B-Year
                  5 Noritsyn, Nikolay IM CAN 2512 1991
                  12 Panjwani, Raja IM CAN 2448 1990
                  14 Plotkin, Mark IM CAN 2430 1998
                  15 Samsonkin, Artiom IM CAN 2428 1989
                  16 Song, Michael IM CAN 2421 1999
                  17 Thavandiran, Shiyam IM CAN 2420 1992
                  18 Le, Quang Long IM CAN 2420 1989
                  19 Krnan, Tomas IM CAN 2417 1988
                  20 Porper, Edward IM CAN 2398 1963
                  21 Kleinman, Michael IM CAN 2387 1994
                  22 Yu, Zong Yang FM CAN 2387 1999
                  23 Chiku-Ratte, Olivier-Kenta IM CAN 2377 1999
                  24 Plotkin, Victor FM CAN 2367 1968
                  25 Gerzhoy, Leonid IM CAN 2348 1987
                  26 Zhao, Ian FM CAN 2347 2005
                  27 Talukdar, Rohan FM CAN 2341 2003
                  28 Hebert, Jean IM CAN 2339 1957
                  29 Hua, Eugene FM CAN 2336 2003
                  30 Wang, Richard IM CAN 2336 1998
                  31 Cummings, David H. IM CAN 2335 1961
                  32 Zhang, Yuanchen FM CAN 2330 2001
                  33 Hartman, Brian IM CAN 2319 1957
                  34 Barbeau, Sylvain FM CAN 2310 1961
                  35 Doknjas, Joshua FM CAN 2305 2002
                  Before 2020, my hopes were on Mark Plotkin and Michael Song.
                  Rohan Talukdar has two IM norms, both earned within one month or so of each other.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    It will be good to have an IM in Windsor. It was a bit of a tragedy that Ray never got the title. My understanding was he was only a few FIDE points short. (and of course Milan Vukadinov was that strength but never had time to get his norms or play in a Canadian Zonal to get the title)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Lists always remind me of Letterman's Top 10 List...amusing, but with unclear value beyond that. In the individuals indicated, one has to consider the relative time they played to make any attempt at comparison or consideration.

                      For example, who since has come anywhere close to Capablanca's feat of defeating all the other participants at the 1914 St. Petersburg Event at 5-1 odds in speed chess? Who since has beaten the best with a 4.5 point margin in blitz as Fischer did in 1970? Many indicate the true indicator of the best players is whether they dominated the other top players of their time.

                      One must also keep in mind that for some of the players cited who were most active in the 1970s or 1980s, most events were not FIDE rated. Thus comparing Day, for instance, to any current IM relative to when he was dominate (1969-1981) is unfair to the other players...Day was clearly a GM. Several noteworthy GM's at the time were astounded when GM Spraggett broke onto the scene winning major events and ultimately in the Candidates, as he was a complete unknown beforehand, playing in mostly non-FIDE rated Canadian events. That feat may never be duplicated.

                      I had the great fortune to play many of the strongest players (Canadian, but also some US and European), particularly when I was most active (1984-1987), and notwithstanding any list, I have my own perspective of relative strengths. One player unmentioned, whom I had the great pleasure of playing as I represented the HCCC to a second Ontario team championship, was IM Bruce Amos - again, an extraordinary talent (and wonderful person), and again, many events he played in were not FIDE rated.

                      I must also mention my great mentor, IM Paul Vaitonis, 3 time Lithuanian Champion, twice Canadian Champion, and a very successful financial career and wonderful family. Of course, if not for his better judgement to find his career in finance, he most certainly would have been a GM, among others I could cite, some of whom are absent from any list.

                      Some players aren't playing for titles or records, they simply love chess...some of the great Canadian players in that category (my opinion) include Bob Zuk - unbelievable insight, he could truly beat anyone, yet he was most interested in chess, not the result. Kevin Gentes - what a talent! Yet, he got so wrapped up in the beauty he could only see, he would make time trouble oversights...and so many more examples.

                      Chess is very different now, it has been since the 1990s, with the advent of computers...yet the beauty remains. Notwithstanding this, yes, what talent there was and is!

                      Good luck to all regardless of your chess ambition.


                      Brian



                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Brian Hartman View Post
                        Lists always remind me of Letterman's Top 10 List...amusing, but with unclear value beyond that. In the individuals indicated, one has to consider the relative time they played to make any attempt at comparison or consideration.

                        For example, who since has come anywhere close to Capablanca's feat of defeating all the other participants at the 1914 St. Petersburg Event at 5-1 odds in speed chess? Who since has beaten the best with a 4.5 point margin in blitz as Fischer did in 1970? Many indicate the true indicator of the best players is whether they dominated the other top players of their time.

                        One must also keep in mind that for some of the players cited who were most active in the 1970s or 1980s, most events were not FIDE rated. Thus comparing Day, for instance, to any current IM relative to when he was dominate (1969-1981) is unfair to the other players...Day was clearly a GM. Several noteworthy GM's at the time were astounded when GM Spraggett broke onto the scene winning major events and ultimately in the Candidates, as he was a complete unknown beforehand, playing in mostly non-FIDE rated Canadian events. That feat may never be duplicated.

                        I had the great fortune to play many of the strongest players (Canadian, but also some US and European), particularly when I was most active (1984-1987), and notwithstanding any list, I have my own perspective of relative strengths. One player unmentioned, whom I had the great pleasure of playing as I represented the HCCC to a second Ontario team championship, was IM Bruce Amos - again, an extraordinary talent (and wonderful person), and again, many events he played in were not FIDE rated.

                        I must also mention my great mentor, IM Paul Vaitonis, 3 time Lithuanian Champion, twice Canadian Champion, and a very successful financial career and wonderful family. Of course, if not for his better judgement to find his career in finance, he most certainly would have been a GM, among others I could cite, some of whom are absent from any list.

                        Some players aren't playing for titles or records, they simply love chess...some of the great Canadian players in that category (my opinion) include Bob Zuk - unbelievable insight, he could truly beat anyone, yet he was most interested in chess, not the result. Kevin Gentes - what a talent! Yet, he got so wrapped up in the beauty he could only see, he would make time trouble oversights...and so many more examples.

                        Chess is very different now, it has been since the 1990s, with the advent of computers...yet the beauty remains. Notwithstanding this, yes, what talent there was and is!

                        Good luck to all regardless of your chess ambition.
                        Brian
                        Very much on point Brian. Your mention of Bruce Amos made me recall how much I admired him in the late 60's and 70's. I remember listening to him analyzing some positions (perhaps with Denis Allan - another very talented player) and just marvelling at how much Bruce could see at a glance - he seemingly could understand a position very quickly and thereby come up with a
                        very natural plan to proceed in short order. Not to mention his prowess in a subject I was working hard at (Math) and his expertise in Go. There were a number of players in the 60,70,80's who
                        were extremely dangerous in the right sort of position and even in the wrong position!
                        ...Mike Pence: the Lord of the fly.

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