Upcoming Chess Books

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Upcoming Chess Books

    September 5, 2020


    Early this year I heard that a new book on Adolf Anderssen had been published and I wrote to the author,
    Robert Johnson, and purchased a copy. In due course, Robert informed me that it had been tracked to Canada on July 13. After that it may or may not have come to my house and then, abruptly, sent back to Australia without my ever having received notice that it was here.

    Because of Covid-19, the mails are all screwed up. With few flights, air freight is at a premium. Post offices are buried under mail and packages. I am waiting for a second posted copy.

    This is how an English vendor describes the book:

    Robert Johnson: Adolf Anderssen. Combinative Chess Genius. An Autobiography with 80 Annotated Games.

    Self-published, Australia, 2020. Large heavy hardback (22 x 30cm), pictorial covers. 353pp., 36 fine large photos (3 in colour of Anderssen's grave), comprises ten chapters with biography and 80 annotated games using contemporary annotations where possible, appendix with Steinitz's Obituary of Anderssen, bibliography and indexes. Printed on high quality paper with large type and diagrams. The author has "endeavoured to present the fullest, most accurate possible account of Anderssen's life in English." A superb book. Signed and dated by the author on the endpaper.
    _________

    One has a rare opportunity of hearing a review of the book on YouTube by Jeffrey Baffo:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqYmvKGNjvs&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR0ooWEJrjRr2rOmT7Z8HwPe3WNsdEfrT6aI1WZxMVTTBs-ARSR0NNfxJbU

    I am waiting for my copy to come!

    Comment


    • #62
      Upcoming Chess Books

      September 5, 2020

      Three recent chess novels

      Spurious Games

      By David Jenkins

      Troubador Publishing, 2020
      Paperback, 330 pages

      Publisher’s Blurb

      A local chess player is discovered dead, his untimely end seeming suspicious. Detective Inspector John Logos of Cornwall's St Borstal Constabulary is called in to investigate what turns out to be a serial killer running amok in the sedate contemplative world of Cornish chess. The detectives quickly find themselves as pawns in the game of an arrogant mastermind calling himself 'The Turk' who taunts them with chess-related clues. Baffled, they call in Caradoc Pritchard, an eccentric Welsh Professor, serial iconoclast and expert in forensic profiling. Together they must work against the clock to predict the killer's next move.

      As the action comes to a dramatic climax only one player can win, but only if he avoids stalemate.

      A literary novel of ideas masquerading as a whodunit, Spurious Games exhibits a consistently droll sense of humour that belies its essential seriousness as an extended riff on authenticity. Despite its roots in chess, there are a number of important 'side shows', all treated with equal ironic irreverence.

      The Author

      David Jenkins is a retired Professor who has occupied a variety of chairs including at the University of Warwick (Arts Education) and the University of the South Pacific (Education and Psychology). He is a keen chess player who when a lot younger played for Fiji in the 1994 Moscow Chess Olympiad, a memorable experience, although not quite the honour it sounds (think Eddy the Eagle). His main claim to fame is as a qualitative evaluator of social programs. His report on the pan-European training program for youth leaders using non-formal methods (TALE) was named as the 2011 'Outstanding Evaluation of the Year' by the American Evaluation Association ('I Could a TALE Unfold').

      David is a painter and regular cartoonist, currently living in Cornwall where he is President of the Cornwall Chess Association. Although widely published as an academic, at the Open University and elsewhere, Spurious Games is his first novel.

      David has designed an informative website in support of his novel Spurious Games with the domain name spuriousgames.org It includes excerpts, a gallery of images and comments around the themes of the novel as well as other writings.
      ________

      The Greenbecker Gambit

      By Ben Graff

      The Conrad Press, 2020
      Paperback, 368 pages

      Publisher’s Blurb

      'I only feel truly alive when the chess clock is ticking and the patterns on the squares in front of me are dancing in my head. Very little else gives me the same feeling. Nothing else, that does not involve a flame.' Tennessee Greenbecker is bravely optimistic as he sets out to claim what he sees as rightfully his - the title of world chess champion. But who is he really? Is he destined to be remembered as chess champion or fire-starter? Either way might this finally be his moment? 'A chess-playing delusional pyromaniac - what could possibly go wrong? If chess is a metaphor for life, Graff has weaved his magic and brought the two together - with far-reaching consequences.

      Compellingly dark and disturbing, Graff's insight into madness will have you on the edge of your seat. A tremendous read.' Carl Portman - 'Chess Behind Bars' 'A tragicomic tale of a fading chess player, set against the background of a vividly-realised London. Graff writes brilliantly about life and chess, and Tennessee Greenbecker is destined to become one of the characters of our time.' Harper J. Cole - 'Subcutis' 'Graff has created an unforgettable chess anti-hero; his novel is amusing, affecting, and as addictive as internet blitz.' Mark Ozanne - 'Chess Fever' 'Graff is a phenomenal writer. With Tennessee Greenbecker, we can see he is not just a great chess journalist but also has an amazing creative side.' Evan Rabin - National Chess Master

      The Author

      Ben Graff is a writer, journalist and Corporate Affairs professional. He is a regular contributor to Chess and Authors Publish. Ben is not a grandmaster but did draw with one once.
      _______

      The Berlin Defence: A Novel Paperback

      By Andy Mack

      Elk and Ruby Publishing, 2020
      Paperback, 291 pages

      Publisher’s Blurb

      That afternoon, Lothar sat down opposite Lev Ivanov, and with a furrowed brow, determinedly pushed his King’s pawn forward two squares, punching down the clock as he did so. When Ivanov ventured a Sicilian Defence, Lothar sacrificed first a Knight and then a Rook for a raging attack.

      Lothar Hartmann dreams of reaching the big time in chess. Overcoming the mind-games of his opponents at the chessboard is a challenge in itself, but how will he cope when he comes face to face with the political manipulation and oppression of his own corrupt government? A tale told with dark humour of love and loss, hopes dashed and regained, it is a window into a world of tactics, psychological warfare and the balance of fate and opportunity, while asking fundamental questions about life’s purpose and moral choices. As Lothar begins to realise that his world is not simply black and white, and that the chess players themselves are pieces, moved across a board to further the reach of East German propaganda, he hatches a plan that defies all expectations.


      The Author

      Andy Mack was born in 1970, in Bromley, South-East England. A keen chess player from an early age, he has competed three times in the British Chess Championships and achieved the title of FIDE Master. He also plays poker to a high standard, and has written a book entitled Omaha 8 or Better – Winning at Hi-Low Poker. In his professional life, Andy qualified as a Chartered Accountant and is a Director in a large accounting firm. Andy continues to live in South-East England. His favourite European city is Berlin, and The Berlin Defence is his first novel.

      Comment


      • #63
        " I only feel truly alive when the chess clock is ticking and the patterns of the squares in front of me are dancing in my head." H'mmm, I like the quote. (maybe thats one thing wrong with tournament chess nowadays - the clocks dont tick) Tennessee Greenbecker - quite the name. Maybe I'll give the book a try.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
          " I only feel truly alive when the chess clock is ticking and the patterns of the squares in front of me are dancing in my head." H'mmm, I like the quote. (maybe thats one thing wrong with tournament chess nowadays - the clocks dont tick) Tennessee Greenbecker - quite the name. Maybe I'll give the book a try.
          Thanks for reminding us of that, I ALSO absolutely LOVED dozens and dozens of clocks ticking!!

          Comment


          • #65
            From directing many large junior events I'm familiar with the sound in the first few minutes of a round, when they're all playing way too fast and all you can hear is clock buttons being slammed. Some time ago I coined the term chronomicide, the sound of many clocks being murdered at once ...

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Stephen Wright View Post
              From directing many large junior events I'm familiar with the sound in the first few minutes of a round, when they're all playing way too fast and all you can hear is clock buttons being slammed. Some time ago I coined the term chronomicide, the sound of many clocks being murdered at once ...
              Chronomicide: great new term!

              Comment


              • #67
                Yes, I like it Stephen. chronomicide - So what would a clock murderer be? - a chronomicidivist?
                Last edited by Hans Jung; Tuesday, 8th September, 2020, 06:42 PM.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by Hans Jung View Post
                  Best Lessons of a Chess Coach! - a legendary book! (see post #55 above) - a reprint great ( highly recommended for collections as well as new tournament players). If you get a chance to meet Sunil Weeramantry (the co-author) and Nakamura's stepdad its well worth it. Hes highly approachable especially if you have something intelligent to say or interesting chess knowledge or questions. (He's a frequent visitor of St.Louis chess club)
                  https://www.chess.com/article/view/b...w-best-lessons review on chess.com tells a bit more

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X