2200 assault

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  • #31
    Thanks for your insights, Aris and sharing your experiences ; looking forward to 2200+ players commenting here.


    Originally posted by Aris Marghetis View Post

    Hi again Amit, so if I may, here's some thoughts about this, as we're on similar trying-to-improve-as-an-adult paths:

    Over the years, I did something similar to what Kerry is describing, which from a pragmatic viewpoint, well, it worked.
    For example, the majority of my games seemed to somehow evolve into a King's Indian structure, no matter what lol

    However, especially against better players, they somehow took advantage of my "need" to reach familiar structures.
    So, during the pandemic, I'm slowly working through Chess.com lessons on whatever opening is next on their lists.
    Even though I won't play the majority of them, it's kinda exciting to try them out, especially if only rated Chess.com
    Yes, I've made some glorious errors (my online rating is about 200 points lower than OTB), but it's been quite fun.

    AND: I sincerely think it's improving me. For example, I was blindly ignorant of IQP strategy before the Tarrasch, etc.
    So in conclusion, I say try lots of different openings. I'm thinking that doing so will improve the openings you do select.
    I WOULD JUST LOVE IT IF SOMEONE RATED AT LEAST 2200 COULD REPLY WITH WHAT THEY THINK OF THIS!

    Comment


    • #32
      Nice, Tony ; I hope to get to this in about 1.5-2 years.

      BTW, the blue books are tougher, AFAIK, and the green ones even more so. I believe they are ordered that way in increasing order of difficulty.

      Originally posted by Tony Li View Post
      Oooooof! Finally finished the 4 orange Yusupov books. Didn't realize 1500 is that hard!

      Hopefully the blue books are a bit easier.
      Last edited by Amit R; Wednesday, 16th December, 2020, 09:21 PM.

      Comment


      • #33
        Finished the first blue book. It is definitely much easier than the 4th orange book. I now see on Aagaard's blog that he views the 4th orange book as the final book in the series (to be read after the the green ones).

        Aris, I don't know how much time you spend on the computer from work, but I find working with books to be more effective after a long day in front of screen. If I get a headache, I know it's from thinking rather than staring.

        Amit, don't worry about openings. Openings are a shortcut to improve results, but they probably aren't important until you conclude your assault on 2200.

        Having said that - Vlad - what some decent opening books/videos out there? I am looking for something 1) sound but 2) where the presenter is able to explain the evaluation at the end of the line to a very low level player.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Amit R View Post
          Thank you for your insights, Kerry. Would you please share what books you had in mind?

          If/when I get around to preparing openings, I was planning to read "Discovering Chess Openings" by John Emms, and then some books on open games by Emms, before looking into any specific opening.
          I was thinking of books like

          https://www.newinchess.com/kaufman-s...lack-and-white

          and similar ones ... (I have NOT read the book I link to above - it is just a good example of what I meant by having a broad generalized strategy).
          It does look like a pretty interesting book, but I already have about 200+ such books <g>
          ...Mike Pence: the Lord of the fly.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Tony Li View Post
            ...
            Aris, I don't know how much time you spend on the computer from work, but I find working with books to be more effective after a long day in front of screen. If I get a headache, I know it's from thinking rather than staring.
            ...
            Tony, thanks for bringing up this point! Maybe this is just my problem, or maybe other older players suffer from the same thing, but I am regularly 200-300 RATING POINTS WORSE ONLINE lol

            I'm working my way through Chess.com lessons, but I have a few books queued up (GREAT purchases over the years that have been patiently waiting for me lol). Like yourself, I significantly prefer books to screen. I also associate screens with work, but it's also that I just can't seem to absorb as well off a screen vs. from a book. Again, I don't know if that's just, or my age cohort, or whatever.

            A nice convenience to consider with your favorite book(s) is to take them to Staples to get spiral-bound. I find that's so much more convenient than having to hold the book open with one hand lol

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Tony Li View Post
              ... decent opening books/videos out there? I am looking for something 1) sound but 2) where the presenter is able to explain the evaluation at the end of the line to a very low level player.
              Hey Tony, here's a few amazing Opening books that would meet your needs...

              Mastering the King's Indian Defense: With the Read and Play Method by Robert Bellin and Pietro Ponzetto

              Mastering the Spanish: With the Read and Play Method by Daniel King and Pietro Ponzetto

              Beside all the clearly described and diagrammed step-by-step instruction of both these books there is also included a Table of Variations. The table shows a lot of quick to grasp characteristics of each variation showing what each line is terms of Strategy & Tactics ... some lines are more tactical than strategical etc..

              For some reason or another I've found that David Bronstein 'speaks to me' through his writings amazing communicator. So his book on the KID is very useful. In chapter 2: The Basic Functions of The Two Armies ... he actually breaks down each piece and its roll, including the pawns. Which pieces go where & why.


              :)





              .
              Last edited by Neil Frarey; Thursday, 17th December, 2020, 04:51 PM.

              Comment


              • #37
                It sounds like you might want to look at several of the books in EVERYMAN CHESS's "MOVE BY MOVE" series.
                I have nothing important to say.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Tony Li View Post
                  Finished the first blue book. It is definitely much easier than the 4th orange book. I now see on Aagaard's blog that he views the 4th orange book as the final book in the series (to be read after the the green ones).

                  Aris, I don't know how much time you spend on the computer from work, but I find working with books to be more effective after a long day in front of screen. If I get a headache, I know it's from thinking rather than staring.

                  Amit, don't worry about openings. Openings are a shortcut to improve results, but they probably aren't important until you conclude your assault on 2200.

                  Having said that - Vlad - what some decent opening books/videos out there? I am looking for something 1) sound but 2) where the presenter is able to explain the evaluation at the end of the line to a very low level player.
                  I loved the old Mastering the King's Indian, Mastering the Benoni and Benko Gambit, Mastering the French, Mastering the Spanish, Mastering the Nimzoindian etc. all with the Read and Play Method. Forget about finding them on Amazon as the prices are inflated though you might find some of them on the shelf at Strategy and Games.

                  Recommendations are really specific to the openings that you want to play.

                  I like the whole Grandmaster Repertoire series from Quality Chess starting with Avrukh's contribution. The Move by Move series from Everyman seems good to me for beginners among the modern books on openings and also players. For books on the Caro-Kann I like the ones by Houska (Everyman), Schandaroff (Grandmaster Repertoire from Quality Chess) and Bologan (New In Chess). The one by Landkwala is pretty good as well. Though for a beginner who could afford only one book I would go with the Houska book.

                  If you like the hyper-accelerated Dragon with black Raja Panjwani's book is quite good. I think I have a hard copy from Strategy and Games, Forwardchess.com and on the Kindle.

                  The Doknjas boys Joshua and John have books on Forwardchess.com and Everyman on the Najdorf (together), Ruy Lopez (Joshua) and Benoni (John).


                  On videos I like the whole Ginger GM series which covers many openings Dutch, French, Queen's Gambit, etc. Nigel Davies is pretty good. Strategy and Games often shows up at tournaments and sells off old software at reduced prices. In Quebec City, I spent hundreds at about $10 per disk. Some of them were engines and I was able to extend my playchess.com subscription which also has lots of videos in their library. I don't think I actually used most of the engines beyond extending my playchess subscription into 2024.

                  I think elsewhere I mentioned Mesgen Amanov and his two sites, Improvemychess.com and LimitlessChess.com, His queen pawn repertoire has brought me some joy.. Ichess.com is pretty good. If you subscribe you get credit for the cost of the subscription that you can redeem as coupons against the videos. They have lots of good presenters. Also you get a library of opening videos for free if you subscribe.

                  I like Ron Henley's videos on the French and London System.

                  Chessable is a good way to learn openings though you have to be sure of the presenter. Some are very good and some not so much. Chessable is a bit pricey but if you buy everything on sale it is not as painful.


                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Neil Frarey View Post

                    Hey Tony, here's a few amazing Opening books that would meet your needs...

                    Mastering the King's Indian Defense: With the Read and Play Method by Robert Bellin and Pietro Ponzetto

                    Mastering the Spanish: With the Read and Play Method by Daniel King and Pietro Ponzetto

                    Beside all the clearly described and diagrammed step-by-step instruction of both these books there is also included a Table of Variations. The table shows a lot of quick to grasp characteristics of each variation showing what each line is terms of Strategy & Tactics ... some lines are more tactical than strategical etc..

                    For some reason or another I've found that David Bronstein 'speaks to me' through his writings amazing communicator. So his book on the KID is very useful. In chapter 2: The Basic Functions of The Two Armies ... he actually breaks down each piece and its roll, including the pawns. Which pieces go where & why.


                    :)

                    .
                    Its not always easy to find those books though. They were the first series that talked about pawn structures on a consistent basis that I can recall.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Nimzoindian and Spanish are available on Ebay but check Strategy and Games first.

                      https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...ethod&_sacat=0

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Sam Sharpe View Post
                        It sounds like you might want to look at several of the books in EVERYMAN CHESS's "MOVE BY MOVE" series.
                        The Starting Out Series are also a good series for beginners.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          On videos, Nigel Davies is pretty good though he usually stays off the beaten trail. I usually like Bologan's videos and books. Marin is also quite good but you have to decide what openings you want to play and then more specific recommendations are possible.

                          Non opening videos you should look at Maurice Ashley's videos for Chessbase.I believe that they sometimes bundle them all together.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Aris Marghetis View Post

                            Hi again Amit, so if I may, here's some thoughts about this, as we're on similar trying-to-improve-as-an-adult paths:

                            Over the years, I did something similar to what Kerry is describing, which from a pragmatic viewpoint, well, it worked.
                            For example, the majority of my games seemed to somehow evolve into a King's Indian structure, no matter what lol

                            However, especially against better players, they somehow took advantage of my "need" to reach familiar structures.
                            So, during the pandemic, I'm slowly working through Chess.com lessons on whatever opening is next on their lists.
                            Even though I won't play the majority of them, it's kinda exciting to try them out, especially if only rated Chess.com
                            Yes, I've made some glorious errors (my online rating is about 200 points lower than OTB), but it's been quite fun.

                            AND: I sincerely think it's improving me. For example, I was blindly ignorant of IQP strategy before the Tarrasch, etc.
                            So in conclusion, I say try lots of different openings. I'm thinking that doing so will improve the openings you do select.
                            I WOULD JUST LOVE IT IF SOMEONE RATED AT LEAST 2200 COULD REPLY WITH WHAT THEY THINK OF THIS!
                            To Vlad: any thoughts on the above post from a few days ago? A few of us lower-rated types would love to know.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Thank you for sharing, Kerry.

                              I am beginning to think I may never get around to serious opening preparation, and will have to focus on other aspects.

                              Originally posted by Kerry Liles View Post

                              I was thinking of books like

                              https://www.newinchess.com/kaufman-s...lack-and-white

                              and similar ones ... (I have NOT read the book I link to above - it is just a good example of what I meant by having a broad generalized strategy).
                              It does look like a pretty interesting book, but I already have about 200+ such books <g>

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Aris Marghetis View Post
                                AND: I sincerely think it's improving me. For example, I was blindly ignorant of IQP strategy before the Tarrasch, etc.
                                So in conclusion, I say try lots of different openings. I'm thinking that doing so will improve the openings you do select.
                                I WOULD JUST LOVE IT IF SOMEONE RATED AT LEAST 2200 COULD REPLY WITH WHAT THEY THINK OF THIS!
                                I have not study openings for a long time and it was not very broad for me - had several with a deep enough knowledge. Though with age (unfortunately) that started to crack. Instead of patching them, I started to play whatever I felt at that moment. I looked through theory and some recent games. Usually I was on my own in a single digit of made moves. But it was good :) However, it is probably not to everyone as openings were on the 3rd or 4th grade type - not a mainstream.
                                BTW my rating returned to >2200 LOL

                                Thus my 2 cnts - yes look as wide as you can. It will bring joy to the game itself. It will enrich your understanding of chess. Maybe later you'll apply some ideas from one opening to other.

                                Comment

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